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Christine L. Borgman, Distinguished Research Professor and Director of the Center for Knowledge Infrastructures at UCLA, is the author of more than 250 publications in information studies, computer science, and communication.

These include three books from MIT Press: Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World, winner of the 2015 American Publishers Award for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE Award) in Computing and Information Sciences; Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet (2007); and From Gutenberg to the Global Information Infrastructure: Access to Information in a Networked World (2000). The latter two books won the Best Information Science Book of the Year award from the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST).

Professor Borgman is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Association for Computing MachineryHer current research addresses scientific data practices and policy, including open science, open data, and open access; data sharing and reuse; and sustainability of knowledge infrastructures. 

Her activities in information policy include service on the Advisory Board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC); the University of California Privacy and Information Security Initiative; UC Academic Computing and Communications Committee (Vice Chair / Chair); UC Cyber Risk Governance Committee; UCLA Board on Privacy and Data Protection; and UCLA Data Governance Task Force (Co-Chair).

Prof. Borgman earned a PhD in Communication from Stanford University, an MLS in information science from the University of Pittsburgh, and a B.A. in mathematics from Michigan State University. She also holds the title of University of California Presidential Chair in Information Studies, Emerita.


Events

Oct 9, 2018 @ 12:00 PM

Open Data, Grey Data, and Stewardship

Universities at the Privacy Frontier

Video & Podcast: Universities produce and consume vast amounts of data for research, teaching, service, and operational purposes. While extremely valuable to universities and… More