Law and Regulation of Emerging Robotics and Automation Technologies: Study Group

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society is now taking applications for a new spring 2016 Study Group exploring the Law and Regulation of Emerging Robotics and Automation Technologies, convened by Harvard Law School visiting professor Kenneth Anderson. The Study Group will meet for four evening sessions on the Harvard Law School campus: on Wednesday March 23, March 30, April 6, and April 13 from 7:30p.m.-9:00p.m. Participation in the Study Group is open to all members of the greater Boston community interested in topics related to robotics and automated technologies. Participants will be selected among the applicants who have submitted an application by Sunday March 13, 2016.

Mar 1 2016 12:00pm to Mar 1 2016 12:00pm

Berkman Klein Luncheon Series

The Big Reverse of the Web: Are Our Policies and Standards Ready?

with Open Source developer, Dries Buytaert

Artificially intelligent personal assistants and algorithms are just the first signs of a web that's designed to deliver the highly personalized information to us at the right time. But what sorts of big issues do we need to tackle when it comes to personal privacy, serendipity and other things that made the web great to begin with?

Cloudy with a Conflict of Laws

How Cloud Computing Has Disrupted the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty System and Why It Matters

This paper describes how the fractal complexity of cloud computing’s physical geography has fractured the system of Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties (MLATs) that arose during the jet age to help shuttle evidence of crime across borders. 

Authored by
  • Vivek Krishnamurthy

16 Feb 2016

Feb 16 2016 12:00pm to Feb 16 2016 12:00pm

Berkman Klein Luncheon Series

Security and Privacy in the World-Sized Web

with Berkman Fellow, Bruce Schneier

We've created a world where technology permeates our economies, social interactions, and intimate selves. Yet these systems demand continuous access to us and our information, and are vulnerable to a host of new security threats from users, from outsiders, and from the corporations and governments that control them. This talk looks back at what we've learned from past attempts to secure these systems, and forward at what technologies, laws, regulations, economic incentives, and social norms we need to secure them in the future.