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Kate Klonick

Faculty Associate

Kate Klonick is an Associate Professor at St. John's University Law School, a fellow at the Brookings Institution and Yale Law School’s Information Society Project. Her research on online speech, freedom of expression, and private governance has appeared in the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, The New Yorker, New York Times, The Atlantic, The Guardian and numerous other publications.


Community

The Klonickles

Murthy Oral Arguments: Sotomayor Scolds the Louisiana Solicitor General and Platforms Are Like the Press

BKC Faculty Associate Kate Klonick recaps the oral argument in Murthy v. Missouri.

Mar 18, 2024
The New York Times

The Future of Online Speech Shouldn’t Belong to One Trump-Appointed Judge in Louisiana

BKC Rebooting Social Media Visiting Scholar Kate Klonick writes about a federal court ruling that restricted the Biden administration’s communications with social media platforms.

Jul 13, 2023
The Markup

Section 230 Just Survived a Brush with Death

Tweets by Rebooting Social Media Visiting Scholar Kate Klonick are referenced in a discussion of Gonzalez v. Google and Twitter v. Taamneh.

May 18, 2023
Harvard Law Review

Of Systems Thinking and Straw Men

BKC Faculty Associate Kate Klonick pens a response to Content Moderation as Systems Thinking by BKC Faculty Associate Evelyn Douek.

Apr 1, 2023
The Atlantic

The Meta Oversight Board Has Some Genuinely Smart Suggestions

RSM Visiting Scholar Kate Klonick writes about the positive steps Meta’s Oversight Board recently took, and how it can…

Dec 9, 2022

Events

Feb 21, 2023 @ 9:30 AM

Gonzalez v. Google Live Analysis

Moderated by Kate Klonick, a panel of internet law experts will react to oral arguments in Gonzalez v. Google...

Apr 9, 2019 @ 12:00 PM

Constitutionalizing Speech Platforms

Featuring Kate Klonick and Thomas Kadri with members of the BKC community

PODCAST & VIDEO: We're never going to get a global set of norms for online speech but do the platforms pick our global values and constitutionalize them? Something to tie them to…