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Old Habits Die Hard: Can Technology Change Deception?

Jeff Hancock, Cornell University

Monday, April 5, 12:30 pm
Berkman Center, 23 Everett Street, second floor

 

This talk is part of The Psychology and Economics of Trust and Honesty speaker series, led by Berkman Fellow Judith Donath and hosted by the Berkman Center for Internet & Society’s Law Lab. For more related to Bird's talk, see this page.

In this talk we'll consider some of the myths commonly held about deception, and use the intersection of technology and deception to surface and rethink our assumptions about how deception functions in our interpersonal and increasingly mediated lives. The talk will cover some experiments we have conducted and propose the notion of shaping deception practices in online environments.

About Jeff

Jeff Hancock is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and in the Faculty of Computing and Information Science, and co-Director of Cognitive Science at Cornell University. His work is concerned with how information technologies – such as email, instant messaging, and social networking sites – affect the way we understand and relate to one another, with a particular emphasis on deception. His research is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense, and his work on lying online has been featured in the New York Times, CNN, NPR, BBC and ABC News and the CBC documentary The Truth About Lying. Dr. Hancock earned his PhD in cognitive psychology at Dalhousie University, Canada, and joined Cornell in 2002.

Links

Download media from this event here.

Past Event
Apr 5, 2010
Time
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

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