Skip to the main content
A Deep-Dive on Digital Self-Determination

A Deep-Dive on Digital Self-Determination

Rory Torres shares her experience as part of Berkman Klein’s latest global research sprint

In an increasingly digital world, our experiences online are shaped by data gathered and wielded to tailor experiences. But what control do users have over that data, where it goes, and how it is used?

Questions of control over personal data were a cross-cutting theme throughout a Research Sprint co-hosted by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and Digital Asia Hub. The Sprint also examined other important dimensions of self-determination in the digitally networked world, for instance, self-expression and participation in civic life and the digital economy, or relationship-building and well-being, to name just a few application areas.

The three-month program for graduate students focused on digital self-determination spanning a range of geographies, backgrounds, and contexts. The cohort, who came from 21 countries across the globe, convened regularly to participate in critical discussions and create accessible educational resources — including a Wikipedia page and a Wikiversity Living Syllabus — on the topic.

Mary Rhauline “Rory” Torres, Harvard Law LL.M. ’21 was a participant in a recent Research Sprint from the Berkman Klein Center. Courtesy image.

One participant, Mary Rhauline “Rory” Torres, Harvard Law LL.M. ’21, joined the sprint from Mangaldan, Pangasinan, in the Philippines. We spoke with Torres about her experience in the program, what she learned, and how it informed her work.

Read the Q & A on Medium

You might also like


Projects & Tools 02

The Ethics of Digitalization

Led by the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society (HIIG), the Berkman Klein Center, and the Digital Asia Hub, and in collaboration with the Global Network of…

Digital Self-Determination Research Sprint

From March to May 2021, we co-hosted a virtual program that convened 25 student participants from 21 countries spread over six continents.