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This is a Berkman Klein alum page. The information below may be out of date.

Elizabeth Stark is a board member of the international student organisation Freeculture.org and the founder of the Harvard Free Culture group. She holds an BA from Brown University in international relations and is entering her third year at Harvard Law School, where she works for the Berkman Center for Internet and Society on such projects as Filtering and the Digital Media Exchange.

Elizabeth is an editor of the Harvard Journal of Law Technology and a Teaching Fellow for courses in Cyberlaw and Electronic Music, and conducts research on the legal implications of new technologies. She has worked with organisations such as the EFF, Creative Commons Brazil and Audionautes in France, examining the impact of digital technology on law and culture.

Elizabeth speaks French, German, and Portuguese and has lived and worked in places such as Berlin, Rio de Janeiro, Paris, and Singapore.

More information on Elizabeth Stark can be found here.



News

Apr 7, 2011

Submit your ideas for a better Internet!

(deadline: April 15)

The new "Ideas for a Better Internet" initiative aims at fostering innovation around the most pressing issues currently facing the Internet. We invite anyone — interested… More

Apr 21, 2010

(Futures) news, social science, Internet filtering (more)

Seven different pieces of writing and research from the Berkman Center community have appeared over the last seven days, from Ethan Zuckerman's essay in the latest issue of… More

Oct 29, 2009

Radio Berkman 135: The Quest for a Free Culture

This week on Radio Berkman: NYU's Gabriella Coleman discusses Free Culture with guest host Elizabeth Stark... More


Courses

Ideas for a Better Internet - Fall 2011/Winter 2012

This joint Harvard/Stanford interdisciplinary seminar will continue a year-long arc of developing and building ideas for a better internet. More

Difficult Problems in Cyberlaw - Winter 2010

This course, Difficult Problems in Cyberlaw, covers the Global Network Initiative, ubiquitous human computing, the future of Wikipedia, and cybersecurity. More