Current Berkman People and Projects

Keep track of Berkman-related news and conversations by subscribing to this page using your RSS feed reader. This aggregation of blogs relating to the Berkman Center does not necessarily represent the views of the Berkman Center or Harvard University but is provided as a convenient starting point for those who wish to explore the people and projects in Berkman's orbit. As this is a global exercise, times are in UTC.

The list of blogs being aggregated here can be found at the bottom of this page.

April 28, 2017

Berkman Center front page
Digital Rights and Online Harassment in the Global South

Teaser

An inside look at the challenges facing women, human rights defenders, and other internet users in Pakistan, from online harassment to privacy and free expression.

Event Date

May 10 2017 12:00pm to May 10 2017 12:00pm
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Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
23 Everett Street, Second Floor Conference Room, Cambridge, MA
RSVP required to attend in person
Event will be live webcast on this page at 12:00 pm

Nighat Dad will speak on the state of freedom of expression, privacy, and online harassment in the global south, with a particular focus on Pakistan, where she is based. Dad is the Executive Director of the Digital Rights Foundation (DRF), a nonprofit that seeks to protect the freedom and security of all people online, with a particular focus on women and human rights defenders.

In late 2016, DRF launched a cyber harassment hotline, and Dad will present key findings from a recently released report [LINK: http://digitalrightsfoundation.pk/cyber-harassment-helpline-completes-its-four-months-of-operations/] on the first four months of its operation. The report affords up-to-the-moment insights on significant challenges facing internet users in Pakistan and throughout the region. 

About Nighat

Nighat Dad is the Executive Director of Digital Rights Foundation, Pakistan. She is an accomplished lawyer and a human rights activist. Nighat is one of the pioneers who have been campaigning around access to open internet in Pakistan and globally. She has been actively campaigning  and  engaging at a policy level on issues focusing on Internet Freedom, Women and Technology, Digital Security, and Women’s empowerment. Nighat has been named in TIME's Next Generation Leaders List, and has won Atlantic Council Freedom of Expression Award, and also Human Rights Tulip Award for her work in digital rights and freedom. She is also an Affiliate at Berkman Klien Centre for the year 2016-2017

 

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by doyolu at April 28, 2017 08:59 PM

MediaBerkman
The International State of Digital Rights, a Conversation with the UN Special Rapporteur
UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, David Kaye, is joined in conversation by Nani Jansen Reventlow, a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center and Adviser to the Cyberlaw Clinic, about his upcoming thematic report on digital access and human rights, as well as the most burning issues regarding free speech online and digital rights including encryption, fake news, online gender-based abuse and the global epidemic of internet censorship. More on this event here: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2017/04/DavidKaye

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 28, 2017 04:59 PM

Miriam Meckel
Von Deutschland lernen

Ivanka Trump gilt als wahre First Lady der USA. Noch vor ihrem Vater, Präsident Donald Trump, war sie in Deutschland zu Gast. In ihrem ersten Interview mit einem nicht-amerikanischen Medium verrät die 35-Jährige, welche Absichten hinter ihrem Besuch stecken.

Jeder redet über die Trumps – aber live bestaunen kann man ein Mitglied der Präsidentenfamilie erst kommende Woche in Deutschland. Dann wird Ivanka Trump, First Daughter der USA und wohl einflussreichste Beraterin von US-Präsident Donald Trump, anreisen – und in Berlin auf Einladung von Kanzlerin Angela Merkel am W20-Gipfel im Rahmen der deutschen G20-Präsidentschaft teilnehmen sowie ein Siemens-Werk in der Hauptstadt besichtigen.

Trump, 35, polarisiert: Sie wirkt moderner, emanzipierter und weltoffener als ihr Vater. Andererseits hielt sie diesem im Wahlkampf trotz diverser Skandale die Treue und berät ihn nun gemeinsam mit Ehemann Jared Kushner im Weißen Haus.

Besonderes Interesse zeigt Trump an Wirtschafts- und Ausbildungsthemen. Mit der WirtschaftsWoche sprach sie im ersten Interview mit einem nicht-amerikanischen Medium über die Motive hinter ihrem Deutschlandbesuch.

Hier geht es zum Interview mit Ivanka Trump zur Berufsausbildung in Deutschland, Erfindergeist als Treiber der Wirtschaft und ihre eigene Vorbildrolle als Unternehmerin.

by Miriam Meckel at April 28, 2017 06:53 AM

Justin Reich
Use Design Thinking to Mitigate Bias and Resistance to Change
To thwart resistance to change and mitigate bias, consider design thinking to provide teachers with an opportunity to learn.

by Beth Holland at April 28, 2017 01:46 AM

April 27, 2017

Cyberlaw Clinic - blog
Student Commentary on the Clinic’s Internet Jurisdiction Work

asnThe HLS Clinical and Pro Bono programs blog currently features a post by spring 2017 Cyberlaw Clinic student (and graduating Harvard Law School 3L) Alicia Solow-Niederman.  The piece highlights Alicia’s work this semester with Clinic Assistant Director Vivek Krishnamurthy and our friend and Clinic advisor Nani Jansen Reventlow. Alicia was part of a team that helped to tackle some complex questions about online jurisdiction, preparing a working paper along with student Javier Careaga Franco (LL.M ’17) entitled “Here, There, or Everywhere?.” The paper offers a methodology and taxonomy aimed at clarifying principles to govern the geographic scope of orders to remove online content.

by Clinic Staff at April 27, 2017 07:07 PM

MediaBerkman
Holding Hospitals Hostage: From HIPAA to Ransomware
In 2016, more than a dozen hospitals and healthcare organizations were targeted by ransomware attacks that temporarily blocked crucial access to patient records and hospital systems until administrators agreed to make ransom payments to the perpetrators. Emerging online threats such as ransomware are forcing hospitals and healthcare providers to revisit and re-evaluate the existing patient data protection standards, codified in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, that have dictated most healthcare security measures for more than two decades. This talk looks at how hospitals are grappling with these new security threats, as well as the ways that the focus on HIPAA compliance has, at times, made it challenging for these institutions to adapt to an emerging threat landscape. About Dr. Wolff Josephine Wolff is an assistant professor in the Public Policy department at RIT and a member of the extended faculty of the Computing Security department. She is a faculty associate at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet & Society and a fellow at the New America Cybersecurity Initiative. Wolff recieved her PhD. in Engineering Systems Division and M.S. in Technology and Policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as her A.B. in Mathematics from Princeton University. Her research interests include cybersecurity law and policy, defense-in-depth, security incident reporting models, economics of information security, and insurance and liability protection for computer security incidents. She researches cybersecurity policy with an emphasis on the social and political dimensions of defending against security incidents, looking at the intersection of technology, policy, and law for defending computer systems and the ways that technical and non-technical computer security mechanisms can be effectively combined, as well as the ways in which they may backfire. Currently, she is working on a project about a series of cybersecurity incidents over the course of the past decade, tracing their economic and legal aftermath and their impact on the current state of technical, social, and political lines of defense. She writes regularly about cybersecurity for Slate, and her writing has also appeared in The Atlantic, Scientific American, The New Republic, Newsweek, and The New York Times Opinionator blog. For more information on this event visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/digitalhealth/2017/04/Wolff

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 27, 2017 06:02 PM

Berkman Center front page
Digital Health @ Harvard, April 2017 – Holding Hospitals Hostage: From HIPAA to Ransomware

Subtitle

featuring Dr. Josephine Wolff

Teaser

For hospitals and healthcare providers, data protection efforts have long been driven by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. This talk will look at recent trends in the online threats facing hospitals and consider how effective HIPAA is at addressing these threats, and how it has shaped the state of healthcare data security--for better and for worse.

Parent Event

Digital Health @ Harvard | Brown Bag Lunch Series

Event Date

Apr 27 2017 12:00pm to Apr 27 2017 12:00pm
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This is a talk in the monthly Digital Health @ Harvard Brown Bag Lunch Series, which is co-hosted by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
23 Everett Street, Second Floor, Cambridge, MA

In 2016, more than a dozen hospitals and healthcare organizations were targeted by ransomware attacks that temporarily blocked crucial access to patient records and hospital systems until administrators agreed to make ransom payments to the perpetrators. Emerging online threats such as ransomware are forcing hospitals and healthcare providers to revisit and re-evaluate the existing patient data protection standards, codified in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, that have dictated most healthcare security measures for more than two decades. This talk will look at how hospitals are grappling with these new security threats, as well as the ways that the focus on HIPAA compliance has, at times, made it challenging for these institutions to adapt to an emerging threat landscape.

About Dr. Wolff

Josephine Wolff is an assistant professor in the Public Policy department at RIT and a member of the extended faculty of the Computing Security department. She is a faculty associate at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet & Society and a fellow at the New America Cybersecurity Initiative.

Wolff recieved her PhD. in Engineering Systems Division and M.S. in Technology and Policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as well as her A.B. in Mathematics from Princeton University.

Her research interests include cybersecurity law and policy, defense-in-depth, security incident reporting models, economics of information security, and insurance and liability protection for computer security incidents. She researches cybersecurity policy with an emphasis on the social and political dimensions of defending against security incidents, looking at the intersection of technology, policy, and law for defending computer systems and the ways that technical and non-technical computer security mechanisms can be effectively combined, as well as the ways in which they may backfire. Currently, she is working on a project about a series of cybersecurity incidents over the course of the past decade, tracing their economic and legal aftermath and their impact on the current state of technical, social, and political lines of defense. She writes regularly about cybersecurity for Slate, and her writing has also appeared in The Atlantic, Scientific American, The New Republic, Newsweek, and The New York Times Opinionator blog.

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by ahancock at April 27, 2017 12:00 PM

Harry Lewis
The AS11 staff, then and now
Applied Sciences 11 was the original name for CS50, a course I created in 1981, before Harvard had either courses called "Computer Science" or an undergraduate degree by that name. AS11 wasn't a renaming of Nat Sci 110, it was a whole new enterprise, an attempt to be systematic and scientific about the introduction to the science of computing, more rigorous than Nat Sci 110 and with less of the Santa-suit lecture stunts that I had pulled in Nat Sci 110. It is hard to remember how thinly staffed we were in those days. Not only did I not get a leave term or even summer support to prepare the new course, I actually taught AM108 (now CS121) simultaneously in the fall of 1981. And the previous term hadn't been a light one--I was teaching AM110 (now CS51). (My whole teaching record, and an almost complete list of my TFs, is here.)

The second year I taught the course, the midterm was on Hallowe'en, and I invited the TFs over to my house for dinner after we finished grading. Margo Seltzer--now my colleague two doors down but then an undergraduate--arranged for everyone to show up with tweed jackets, mustaches, and pipes. (I still wear tweed jackets, but the pipe and mustache are long gone.) Here is the group photo, about which I blogged five years ago.
A remarkable number returned for the Celebration of Computer Science on my 70th birthday.
Left to right, Ted Nesson, Lisa Hellerstein, Phillip Stern, Michael Massimilla, HRL, Craig Partridge, Christoph Freytag, Margo Seltzer, Larry Lebowitz, John Thielens, John Ramsdell, Phil Klein. Rony Sebok also showed up, a few minutes too late to make it into the picture, and Larry Denenberg and boo gershun, who didn't make it into the original picture, were also at the event. So that is 14 of the original 23 came back 35 years after the fact (no more than 22 are still living). Sweet!

Thanks everyone!

by Harry Lewis (noreply@blogger.com) at April 27, 2017 01:59 AM

April 26, 2017

MediaBerkman
A More Perfect Internet: Promoting Digital Civility and Combating Cyber-Violence
This event is co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. This talk addresses a range of issues relating to digital incivility with en emphasis on cyber-violence. What are the most common negative behaviors online? How are these perceived and experienced by users? What is cyber-violence? Who does it target? What steps can be taken to prevent such behaviors? How should they be addressed once they've occurred? What challenges does the legal system face when dealing with cyber-violence related offenses? Professor Carrillo draws from the Cyber-Violence Project he co-directs at GW Law School to offer responses to these and related questions. About Arturo Arturo J. Carrillo is Professor of Law, Director of the International Human Rights Clinic, and Co-Director of the Global Internet Freedom & Human Rights Project at The George Washington University Law School. Before joining the faculty, Professor Carrillo served as the acting director of the Human Rights Clinic at Columbia Law School, where he was also Lecturer in Law and the Henkin Senior Fellow with Columbia’s Human Rights Institute. Prior to entering the academy in 2000, he worked as a legal advisor in the Human Rights Division of the United Nations Observer Mission to El Salvador (ONUSAL), as well as for non-governmental organizations in his native Colombia, where he also taught international law and human rights. From 2005 to 2010, Professor Carrillo was a senior advisor on human rights to the U.S. Agency on International Development (USAID) in Colombia. Professor Carrillo’s expertise is in public international law; Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and human rights, especially Internet freedom; transitional justice; human rights and humanitarian law; and comparative clinical legal education. He is the author of a number of publications in English and Spanish on these topics. His recent article, "Having Your Cake and Eating It Too? Zero-rating, Net Neutrality and International Law," was published by the Stanford Technology Law Review (Fall 2016). As part of his clinical practice, Professor Carrillo has litigated extensively in U.S. courts and before regional human rights tribunals. Professor Carrillo received a BA from Princeton University, a JD from The George Washington University, and an LLM from Columbia University. For more info on this event visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/node/99846

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 26, 2017 04:19 PM

April 25, 2017

Berkman Center front page
The International State of Digital Rights, a Conversation with the UN Special Rapporteur

Subtitle

David Kaye in conversation with Nani Jansen Reventlow

Teaser

Join the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, David Kaye, in conversation with Berkman Klein Center Fellow, Nani Jansen Reventlow.

Event Date

Apr 25 2017 4:00pm to Apr 25 2017 4:00pm
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Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 4:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

This event is co-sponsored by The Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, David Kaye, is joined in conversation by Nani Jansen Reventlow, a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center and Adviser to the Cyberlaw Clinic, about his upcoming thematic report on digital access and human rights, as well as the most burning issues regarding free speech online and digital rights including encryption, fake news, online gender-based abuse and the global epidemic of internet censorship.

The Special Rapporteur also speaks about his work in both national and international free speech cases, after which the audience asks questions. 

About David Kaye

David Kaye, a clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, is the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, appointed by the UN Human Rights Council in June 2014. His rapporteurship has addressed, among other topics, encryption and anonymity as promoters of freedom of expression, the protection of whistleblowers and journalistic sources, and the roles and responsibilities of private Internet companies. Early in his career he was a lawyer in the U.S. State Department, handling issues such as the applicability of the Geneva Conventions in the wake of the attacks of September 11, 2001. His academic research and writing have focused on accountability for serious human rights abuses, international humanitarian law, and the international law governing use of force. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations and former member of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law, he has also published essays in such publications as Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, Foreign Policy, JustSecurity and The Los Angeles Times.

About Nani Jansen Reventlow

Nani Jansen Reventlow is an Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers and a 2016-2017 Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. She is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. 

Between 2011 and 2016, Nani has overseen the litigation practice of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI) globally, leading or advising on cases before various national and international courts. At the Berkman Klein Center, Nani's work focuses on cross-disciplinary collaboration in litigation that challenges barriers to free speech online. She also acts as an Advisor to the Cyberlaw Clinic.

Links

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by candersen at April 25, 2017 08:00 PM

Next Gen Podcast Distribution Protocols:

Subtitle

Innovation and Governance in Open Development Initiatives

Teaser

The goals of the symposium include furthering cooperation among various players in the world of podcast creation and distribution and consideration of recommendations on standards, enhancements, extensions, and other methods to support the growth of podcasting as an open and inclusive medium.

Event Date

May 11 2017 8:30am to May 11 2017 5:00pm
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Thursday, May 11, 2017, 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
Harvard Law School campus, Wasserstein Hall
1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA​
Milstein East C (room 2036, second floor)

Registration is limited. Please sign up here.


Presented by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at the Columbia Journalism School, in Collaboration with the syndicated.media Open Working Group.


On May 11, 2017, the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society and Tow Center for Digital Journalism will host and facilitate a symposium, in collaboration with the syndicated.media open working group, to address the process of developing standards that support the distribution of syndicated audio content.  The event will look back at the evolution of the RSS protocol and look forward at the need for new technical infrastructure to support an expanding podcast distribution landscape.  Participants will have the opportunity to engage in both higher-level policy discussions and technical deep-dives throughout the course of this one-day event.

The goals of the symposium include furthering cooperation among various players in the world of podcast creation and distribution and consideration of recommendations on standards, enhancements, extensions, and other methods to support the growth of podcasting as an open and inclusive medium.  It will bring together academic, non-profit, and commercial constituencies to address, among other things:

  • the history of media protocols;

  • promises and pitfalls associated with open development initiatives;

  • rights issues relevant to openly syndicated content;

  • questions of governance and stakeholder engagement; and

  • technical planning and implementation for next generation podcast distribution

The symposium will mix talks and panels that generally address these issues (curated by the Berkman Klein and Tow Center teams) with opportunities for breakouts that allow deeper dives into technical questions around distribution protocols for podcasts and other forms of serialized media (facilitated by members of the syndicated.media community).

Registration is limited; sign up here.

The symposium will be followed by a separate, two-day “Audio for Good”  event, co-hosted by PRX, RadioPublic, and the HBS Digital Initiative. Applications to participate can be submitted here.


About the Hosts

The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society is a research center based at Harvard University.  The Center’s Center's mission is to explore and understand cyberspace; to study its development, dynamics, norms, and standards; and to assess the need or lack thereof for laws and sanctions.  Berkman Klein is a research center, premised on the observation that what it seeks to learn is not already recorded. The Center’s method is to build out into cyberspace, record data, self-study, and share. Its mode is entrepreneurial nonprofit.

The Tow Center for Digital Journalism, established in 2010, provides journalists with the skills and knowledge to lead the future of digital journalism and serves as a research and development center for the profession as a whole. Operating as an institute within Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, the Tow Center is poised to take advantage of a unique combination of factors to foster the development of digital journalism. Its New York location affords access to cutting-edge technologists, a strong culture of journalism and multiple journalism and communication schools, with outstanding universities attached to them. The Tow Center is where technology and journalism meet, and where education and practice meet.

Syndicated.media is a community-driven working group with a mission to ensure that podcasting grows to meet the needs of listeners, creators, producers, publishers, advertisers, and developers, without sacrificing the groundwork that has been established to make it an open and inclusive medium. The goal of the working group is to develop clear and comprehensive standards and best practices. The group now includes more than 100 representatives from a growing number of podcast industry stakeholders, including international participants, and intends to incrementally release updates to existing standards and recommendations for new proposals.

Photo courtesy of Alba Cobra

by candersen at April 25, 2017 04:54 PM

The Quantified Worker

Subtitle

with Berkman Klein Fellow, Ifeoma Ajunwa

Teaser

To apply to Futurecorp, please submit your resume, list of references, and a genetic profile. Once hired, we'll make an appointment for you to receive a sub-dermal tracking microchip.

Parent Event

Berkman Klein Luncheon Series

Event Date

May 2 2017 12:00pm to May 2 2017 12:00pm
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Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
Harvard Law School campus
Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (Room 2036, Second Floor)

RSVP required to attend in person
Event will be live webcast on this page at 12:00 pm

What are the rights of the worker in a society that seems to privilege technological innovation over equality and privacy? How does the law protect worker privacy and dignity given technological advancements that allow for greater surveillance of workers?  What can we expect for the future of work; should privacy be treated as merely an economic good that could be exchanged for the benefit of employment?

About Ifeoma

I am currently a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard for the 2016-2017 year. I will be an Assistant Professor at Cornell University’s Industrial and Labor Relations School (ILR), (with affiliations in Sociology and Law) starting July, 2017.

I hold a Ph.D. from the Sociology Department of Columbia University in the City of New York (emphasis on Organizational Theory and Law and Society). My doctoral research on reentry was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

I am interested in how the law and private firms respond to job applicants or employees perceived as “risky.” I look at the legal parameters for the assessment of such risk and also the organizational behavior in pursuit of risk reduction by private firms. I examine the sociological processes in regards to how such risk is constructed and the discursive ways such risk assessment is deployed in the maintenance of inequality. I also examine ethical issues arising from how firms off-set risk to employees.

My dissertation was an ethnography of a reentry organization that catered to the  formerly incarcerated. In the sum of my published research, I’ve focused on three populations: 1) the formerly incarcerated, 2) carriers of genetic disease, and, 3) workers with perceived unhealthy lifestyles (obesity, smoking, etc.). Thus, my research is at the intersection of organizational theory, management/business law, privacy, health law, and antidiscrimination law.

My most recent article, Limitless Worker Surveillance, with Kate Crawford and Jason Schultz is forthcoming from the California Law Review. The Article has been downloaded more than 2,000 times on SSRN and was endorsed by the NYTimes Editorial Board. In addition to the California Law Review, my articles have been published in the Harvard Business Review, the Fordham Law Review, the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, the Ohio State Law Review, and in the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, among others.

I have  a book contract with Cambridge University Press for a book (“The Quantified Worker,” forthcoming 2018) that will examine the role of technology in the workplace and its effects on management practices as moderated by employment and privacy laws.

 

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by candersen at April 25, 2017 04:34 PM

Digital Expungement: Rehabilitation in the Digital Age

Subtitle

with Berkman Klein Faculty Associate, Eldar Haber

Teaser

Can digital technology lead to the extinction of criminal rehabilitation? How should policymakers strike a balance between protecting civil rights and public safety while ensuring the reintegration into society of individuals with expunged criminal history?

Parent Event

Berkman Klein Luncheon Series

Event Date

Apr 25 2017 12:00pm to Apr 25 2017 12:00pm
Thumbnail Image: 

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

Media from this event will be posted on this page soon!

The concept of criminal rehabilitation in the digital age is intriguing. How can we ensure proper reintegration into society of individuals with a criminal history that was expunged by the state when their wrongdoings remain widely available through commercial vendors (data brokers) and online sources like mugshot websites, legal research websites, social media platforms, and media archives? What are constitutional and pragmatic challenges to ensure digital rehabilitation? Is there a viable solution to solve this conundrum?

About Eldar

Eldar Haber is an Associate Professor (Senior Lecturer) at the Faculty of Law, Haifa University and a Faculty Associate at the Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. He earned his Ph.D. from Tel-Aviv University and completed his postdoctoral studies as a fellow at the Berkman-Klein Center. His main research interests consist of various facets of law and technology including cyber law, intellectual property law (focusing mainly on copyright), privacy, civil rights and liberties, and criminal law. His works were published in various flagship law reviews worldwide, including top-specialized law and technology journals of U.S. universities such as Harvard, Yale and Stanford. His works were presented in various workshops and conferences around the globe, and were cited in academic papers, governmental reports, the media, and U.S. Federal courts.

by candersen at April 25, 2017 04:00 PM

Meeting 21st Century Municipal Internet Access Needs

Subtitle

Perspectives from Boston City Hall and Brookline on City and Regional Infrastructure Planning

Teaser

Hosted by Responsive Communities, a project of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

Event Date

Apr 25 2017 10:00am to Apr 25 2017 12:30pm
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Tuesday, April 25, 2017 between 10:00 am - 12:30 pm
Harvard Law School campus, Wasserstein Hall

This event is hosted by Responsive Communities, a project of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

At this free public event, Jascha Franklin-Hodge, Boston's CIO, will describe the city's ongoing efforts at fostering private sector competition in providing high-speed wired and wireless Internet access. And Kevin Stokes, CIO of Brookline, will discuss the opportunities and challenges in trying to work across institutional and state agency boundaries to obtain fiber-optic network access to boost local bandwidth and reduce costs. Municipal and state officials are invited to attend and then participate in a discussion about best practices and opportunities for collaboration. The event will conclude with an audience Q&A and bag lunch.

10:00-10:05: Introductory remarks: Waide Warner and David Talbot, Responsive Communities, Berkman Klein Center

10:05-⁠10:20: Boston's strategy: Jascha Franklin–Hodge, City of Boston

10:20-10:35: Efforts at inter-agency collaboration: Kevin Stokes, Town of Brookline

10:35-11:15: Open discussion between speakers and invited leaders from municipalities and state agencies and authorities

11:15-⁠11:30: Audience Q&A

11:30-⁠12:30: Bag lunch and networking
 

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

As Boston’s CIO, Jascha Franklin-Hodge works to enhance online service delivery, empower city employees with effective digital tools, and improve access to technology and Internet access service across all Boston neighborhoods. His efforts in Boston include mapping 175 miles of existing city-owned conduit to decrease costs of network deployments, streamlining processes and permitting associated with investment in broadband infrastructure, and ensuring that city infrastructure projects accommodate future network construction. Today five wired and wireless broadband providers serve residents in the city. Franklin-Hodge is now beginning to examine how to prepare for next-generation wireless deployments.

Kevin Stokes has served as CIO for the Town of Brookline and its public schools for 12 years. With municipal and school bandwidth needs rising sharply, Stokes wants wider access to fiber-optic networks and the ability to directly reach wholesale bandwidth available in Boston.  Brookline sits near locations with MBTA and Mass DOT fiber optic lines, as well as hospitals and universities with fiber-optic networks. Stokes, like other municipal CIOs, would like to identify decision-makers and negotiate agreements with public and nonprofit network owners. 

by candersen at April 25, 2017 12:00 PM

April 24, 2017

Cyberlaw Clinic - blog
First Circuit Hears Oral Argument in Unusual Copyright Case

On April 6, 2017, Cyberlaw Clinic students attended oral argument in a First Circuit copyright appeal involving a curious set of facts and legal issues. The case pitted Richard Goren, a Massachusetts attorney, against Xcentric Ventures, LLC, the owner of an online consumer review website known as the Ripoff Report. Goren was upset by a review of his services posted on Ripoff Report by Christian DuPont, the defendant in a prior case where Goren had represented the plaintiff. Goren initially sued Dupont in Massachusetts state court, alleging that Dupont’s review was defamatory. Dupont failed to appear, and thus defaulted. After obtaining a default judgment, Goren requested that Xcentric remove the posting. Xcentric refused, citing the Ripoff Report’s strict “no removal policy.”

Here’s where the dispute gets weird. Upset by Xcentric’s response, Goren obtained amended relief from the same state court that presided over the defamation suit. This amended relief purported to assign Dupont’s copyright in the post to Goren, and to make Goren Dupont’s “attorney-in-fact” to effectuate the transfer. After obtaining a copyright registration, Goren sued Xcentric in federal district court, alleging inter alia that Xcentric had infringed Goren’s newfound proprietary rights as the post’s “owner.”

Goren’s strategy was dubious. He attempted to use copyright law as a backdoor to remedy the alleged defamation. This amounted to a misuse of copyright to censor speech, which is ironic given that copyright law is meant to incentivize the distribution of creative works to the public. Unfortunately, Goren’s strategy is not unprecedented. Similar attempts to use copyright as a means of censorship have been rejected in both the Eleventh and Ninth Circuits. See Katz v. Google Inc., 802 F.3d 1178, 1184 (11th Cir. 2015); Garcia v. Google, Inc., 786 F.3d 733, 736 (9th Cir. 2015) (“[A] weak copyright claim cannot justify censorship in the guise of authorship.”)

Xcentric defended the lawsuit by arguing that the copyright assignment was involuntary, and thus invalid under Section 201(e) of the Copyright Act. See 17 U.S.C. § 201(e). Section 201(e) prohibits involuntary transfers of copyright ownership. According to Xcentric, this meant that the Massachusetts state judge lacked authority to grant Goren the relief he had obtained. Instead, ownership should never have left Dupont’s hands. Since the transfer of ownership resulted from a default judgment in a state defamation suit, Xcentric argued that the transfer was involuntary, and thus invalid under Section 201(e). The district court agreed with Xcentric’s view of the law. It granted Xcentric summary judgment, acknowledging that 201(e) voided the purported transfer of ownership.

Goren appealed the district court’s ruling to the First Circuit, which heard oral argument earlier this month. It seems very likely that the First Circuit will affirm on the Section 201(e) issue. At oral argument, the First Circuit panel appeared to accept the logic of Xcentric’s argument, without questioning its counsel about 201(e). The panel instead focused on a separate attorneys’ fees issue, indicating that it might be leaning toward an affirmance on the merits.

Beyond the copyright claim, Goren also contended that Xcentric’s conduct violated state defamation and competition laws. The district court held that Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act gave Xcentric immunity from those claims. Section 230 states that “[n]o provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.” 47 U.S.C. § 230(c). As an online forum for user reviews, the Ripoff Report qualifies as an “interactive computer service” under the CDA. Dupont, as the post’s author, was the sole “information content provider.” Because of 230’s immunity provision, the district court held that Xcentric could not be found liable for a post it didn’t author. Instead, Goren’s only remedy was against Dupont—against whom Goren has already obtained a default judgment.

While the law clearly immunizes Xcentric from liability for defamation, the policy questions raised by this case are a bit murkier. The CDA was meant to facilitate the growth of the internet as a medium for communication, by ensuring that websites hosting user-generated content could operate without threat of liability for their users’ acts. Congress determined that the threat of liability against such sites was too onerous, given the obvious financial disincentive that the threat of money damages would provide. However, the CDA also gives sites immunity from equitable relief, which means that they can refuse to remove defamatory posts with impunity. This puts individuals like Goren in a difficult situation: Goren obtained a state court defamation judgment against Dupont, but he lacks any practical recourse to have the post removed from the internet.

While immunity from money damages makes sense, does the same hold true for equitable relief? It isn’t obvious that well-tailored equitable relief would pose too-stringent a burden on websites hosting user-generated content. While this policy consideration certainly doesn’t justify Goren’s misuse of copyright law, it might make his strategy a bit more understandable.

Given the law as it stands, the First Circuit will likely affirm the district court’s rulings in favor of Xcentric. While there might be room for debate on the CDA policy question, the law is straightforward. The law is similarly clear on the copyright issue: the purported transfer of ownership cannot be sustained given 201(e)’s ban on involuntary transfers. Goren’s attempt to hijack copyright law might have been clever, but it was suspicious from the start. For the reasons discussed above, his attempt will ultimately fail.  

Leo Angelakos is a 3L at Harvard Law School and a continuing student in the Cyberlaw Clinic during the spring semester 2017.

by Leo Angelakos at April 24, 2017 06:13 PM

John Palfrey
Statement regarding past abuse at Andover

Today, we know that many schools, including Andover, have not always lived up to our commitment to protect students in our care. Over the past year, independent investigators from Sanghavi Law Office have been carrying out a review of all reports of sexual misconduct at our school. We have repeatedly asked community members to share concerns or information they may have with these independent investigators. In August 2016, I sent a public letter to the Andover community about what we knew at that time. Since then, we have received further reports and have referred them all for review to the investigators. On campus, we remain focused on ensuring that we do right by the students we have the privilege to teach today.

Matters related to past teacher misconduct are currently appearing in the press. We take these matters extremely seriously. Our hearts go out to all those who were harmed at our school and at all schools in the past. At Andover, we are committed to learning as much as we can about our school’s past, offering support and acknowledgment for survivors of sexual misconduct, and ensuring the safety and security of all students on our campus today. The harms done to students in the past must never be repeated.


by jgpalfrey at April 24, 2017 06:05 PM

Jeffrey Schnapp
TEDwards

It’s easy to poke fun at some of the tics and tropes that have come to define TED over the course of its 32 years of “spreading ideas that matter.” But the fact remains that TED has been transformative and the TED stage is one of the world’s defining communications and innovation platforms, now fully global, interconnected with a multiplicity of television, radio, and web-based channels, and followed by audiences that number in the tens of millions.

My robotic side kick Gita and I are looking forward to joining the community of the TED speakers this week in Vancouver to talk about the role of robotics in the future of light mobility: movability as we like to call it at Piaggio Fast Forward, which is to say, mobility with a playful and functionally meaningful difference. Here’s what the ludic Piaggio Dictionary at the end of FuturPiaggio has to say about movability:

Movibilità / (Movability) = a Piaggio core value since its foundation, movability means a full-spectrum approach to the problems associated with human mobility that encompasses ships, aircraft, trains, cars, buses, trains, motorcycles, scooters, mopeds, marine outboards, and even bicycles (from Bianchi, once under Piaggio ownership, to the Piaggio e-Bike).

I’ll share the TED talk after it is published online. In the meantime, Gita says… “hi.”

by jeffrey at April 24, 2017 02:34 PM

April 21, 2017

Harry Lewis
Birthday stuff
I turned 70 on April 19. I made the decision some time ago to creep toward retirement around now. So I am giving up my role as Director of Undergraduate Studies in CS, a role I have had most years since even before there was a CS undergraduate major. I will be teaching half time for the next two years (I have already blogged about the cool new Classics of Computer Science course I will be teaching). I then have a year of saved sabbatical, so will transition to Research Professor or some such title on July 1, 2020.

To mark the moment, and to celebrate what has happened to the field of CS at Harvard and elsewhere in the years since I started teaching at Harvard in 1974, SEAS put on a big celebration on my birthday. Many of my former students and teaching fellows attended, and there was a terrific program of talks. You can watch all six hours of it if you are a beggar for punishment! Here is the video -- thanks to the CS50 team for producing it and getting it up so quickly. (If you just want to hear what I, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg had to say, go to about 20 minutes from the end.)

And Harvard Magazine has a nice report on the event. Thanks to everyone, and especially to Margo Seltzer, David Parkes, and Henry Leitner for their roles in putting this together.

We were able to reproduce a facsimile of A 30th Anniversary Family Photo, which I will post when I get it.

In the meantime, here is another classic -- six women computer scientists of the class of 1980 all came back for the celebration. That really means a lot to me! From left to right, Jeanette Hung, Jennifer (Greenspan) Hurwitz, Betty (Ryan) Tylko, Diane (Wasserman) Feldman, HRL, Christine (Ausnit) Hood, and boo gershun. Thanks!


by Harry Lewis (noreply@blogger.com) at April 21, 2017 11:05 PM

Stuart Shieber - The Occasional Pamphlet
WWHD?
… Harry Lewis…
…personal role model…
Image of Harry Lewis courtesy of Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

This past Wednesday, April 19, was a celebration of computer science at Harvard, in honor of the 70th birthday of my undergraduate adviser, faculty colleague, former Dean of Harvard College, baseball aficionado, and personal role model Harry Lewis. The session lasted all day, with talks and reminiscences from many of Harry’s past students, myself included. For those interested, my brief remarks on the topic of “WWHD?” (What Would Harry Do?) can be found in the video of the event.

By the way, the “Slow Down” memo that I quoted from is available from Harry’s website. I recommend it for every future college first-year student.

by Stuart Shieber at April 21, 2017 07:26 PM

Justin Reich
Projects that Learn
Every effort to improve instruction and learning in schools is an opportunity for professional development for educators and school leaders.

by Justin Reich at April 21, 2017 12:43 PM

April 20, 2017

David Weinberger
Mail from Xpeditr

Xpeditr has really overestimated the size of my wine cellar.

wine cellar

The post Mail from Xpeditr appeared first on Joho the Blog.

by davidw at April 20, 2017 10:56 PM

Alien knowledge

Medium has published my long post about how our idea of knowledge is being rewritten, as machine learning is proving itself to be more accurate than we can be, in some situations, but achieves that accuracy by “thinking” in ways that we can’t follow.

This is from the opening section:

We are increasingly relying on machines that derive conclusions from models that they themselves have created, models that are often beyond human comprehension, models that “think” about the world differently than we do.

But this comes with a price. This infusion of alien intelligence is bringing into question the assumptions embedded in our long Western tradition. We thought knowledge was about finding the order hidden in the chaos. We thought it was about simplifying the world. It looks like we were wrong. Knowing the world may require giving up on understanding it.

The post Alien knowledge appeared first on Joho the Blog.

by davidw at April 20, 2017 12:56 AM

April 18, 2017

Berkman Center front page
Internet Access as a Basic Service: Inspiration from our Canadian Neighbors

Subtitle

featuring Mr. Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Teaser

Join the Berkman Klein Center and the HLS Canadian Law Student Association as Mr. Blais speaks about broadband, internet, and the future of connectivity in Canada and around the world

Parent Event

Berkman Klein Luncheon Series

Event Date

Apr 18 2017 12:00pm to Apr 18 2017 12:00pm
Thumbnail Image: 

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

Check back soon for video and audio from this talk!

This event is being sponsored by the HLS Canadian Law Student Association and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

Deemed the modern equivalent of building roads or railways, connecting every person and business to high-speed internet is on the minds of policymakers, advocates, and industry players. Under the leadership of Mr. Jean-Pierre Blais, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (“CRTC”) ruled in December 2016 that broadband internet access is a basic and vital service, thus ensuring that broadband internet joins the ranks of local phone service. The CRTC’s announced reforms will impact over 2 million Canadian households, especially those in remote and isolated areas. The policy aims to ensure that internet download speeds of 50mbps and upload speeds of 10mbps are available to 90% of Canadian homes and business by 2021. 

Join the Berkman Klein Center and the HLS Canadian Law Student Association as Mr. Blais speaks about broadband, internet, and the future of connectivity in Canada and around the world. 

About Jean-Pierre Blais

Before joining the CRTC, Mr. Blais was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Government Operations Sector. In this capacity, he provided advice on the management oversight and corporate governance of various federal departments, agencies and crown corporations.
From 2004 to 2011, he was Assistant Deputy Minister of Cultural Affairs at the Department of Canadian Heritage. While there, he created the Task Force on New Technologies to study the impact of the Internet and digital technologies on Canada’s cultural policies. In addition, he served as Director of the Canadian Television Fund. His responsibilities also included cultural trade policy and international policies and treaties, such as the UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expression. As the Director of Investment from 2004 to 2011, he reviewed transactions in the cultural sector under the Investment Canada Act and provided advice to the Minister of Canadian Heritage.
Mr. Blais also served as Assistant Deputy Minister of International and Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Canadian Heritage. He played a pivotal role in the rapid adoption of the UNESCO Anti-Doping Convention and in garnering international support for the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Anti-Doping Code. Moreover, he represented the Government of Canada on the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games Bid Corporation.
As the CRTC’s Executive Director of Broadcasting from 1999 to 2002, he notably oversaw the development of a licensing framework for new digital pay and specialty services and led reviews of major ownership transactions. He previously was a member of the Legal Directorate, serving as General Counsel, Broadcasting and Senior Counsel. From 1985 to 1991, Mr. Blais was an attorney with the Montreal-based firm Martineau Walker.
Mr. Blais holds a Master of Laws from the University of Melbourne in Australia, as well as a Bachelor of Civil Law and a Bachelor of Common Law from McGill University. He is a member of the Barreau du Québec and the Law Society of Upper Canada.

His term ends on June 17, 2017.

by candersen at April 18, 2017 04:00 PM

The Online Humor Conversation Series at MIT

Subtitle

A spring event series with the MIT Media Lab's Center for Civic Media, and co-sponsored by the Berkman Klein Center

Teaser

From using humor as a tool for resisting an authoritarian government, to rating dogs online, this spring's humor event series has got it all!

Thumbnail Image: 

The Online Humor Conversation Series at MIT brings comedians working online in conversation with academics and researchers to discuss humor's impact and influence on the internet, society and culture.

Join us for conversations on:

  • Cuteness, dogs, and humor in online discourse
  • Humor as a tool for resisting an authoritarian government
  • Race and humor online
  • ...and much more!

Visit mithumorseries.com to find out how to attend in person!

All events are free and open to the public.

Generously funded by the MIT De Florez Fund for Humor, in association with the MIT Media Lab's Center for Civic Media, and co-sponsored by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.

by djones at April 18, 2017 03:04 PM

April 17, 2017

Berkman Center front page
A More Perfect Internet: Promoting Digital Civility and Combating Cyber-Violence

Subtitle

Arturo J. Carrillo is Professor of Law, The George Washington University Law School

Teaser

An exploration of issues related to digital incivility with an emphasis on cyber-violence. When digital turns incivil, how does the law respond?

Event Date

Apr 19 2017 12:00pm to Apr 19 2017 12:00pm
Thumbnail Image: 

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
 

This event is co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University.

This talk will address a range of issues relating to digital incivility with en emphasis on cyber-violence. What are the most common negative behaviors online? How are these perceived and experienced by users? What is cyber-violence? Who does it target? What steps can be taken to prevent such behaviors? How should they be addressed once they've occurred? What challenges does the legal system face when dealing with cyber-violence related offenses? Professor Carrillo will draw from the Cyber-Violence Project he co-directs at GW Law School to offer responses to these and related questions.

About Arturo

Arturo J. Carrillo is Professor of Law, Director of the International Human Rights Clinic, and Co-Director of the Global Internet Freedom & Human Rights Project at The George Washington University Law School. Before joining the faculty, Professor Carrillo served as the acting director of the Human Rights Clinic at Columbia Law School, where he was also Lecturer in Law and the Henkin Senior Fellow with Columbia’s Human Rights Institute. Prior to entering the academy in 2000, he worked as a legal advisor in the Human Rights Division of the United Nations Observer Mission to El Salvador (ONUSAL), as well as for non-governmental organizations in his native Colombia, where he also taught international law and human rights. From 2005 to 2010, Professor Carrillo was a senior advisor on human rights to the U.S. Agency on International Development (USAID) in Colombia. 

Professor Carrillo’s expertise is in public international law; Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and human rights, especially Internet freedom; transitional justice; human rights and humanitarian law; and comparative clinical legal education. He is the author of a number of publications in English and Spanish on these topics. His recent article, "Having Your Cake and Eating It Too? Zero-rating, Net Neutrality and International Law," was published by the Stanford Technology Law Review (Fall 2016). As part of his clinical practice, Professor Carrillo has litigated extensively in U.S. courts and before regional human rights tribunals. Professor Carrillo received a BA from Princeton University, a JD from The George Washington University, and an LLM from Columbia University.

Download original audio and video from this event.

Subscribe to the Berkman Klein events podcast to have audio from all our events delivered straight to you!

by candersen at April 17, 2017 11:51 AM

April 13, 2017

MediaBerkman
Joi Ito and Iyad Rahwan on AI & Society
AI technologies have the potential to vastly enhance the performance of many systems and institutions, from making transportation safer, to enhancing the accuracy of medical diagnosis, to improving the efficiency of food safety inspections. However, AI systems can also create moral hazards, by potentially diminishing human accountability, perpetuating biases that are inherent to the AI's training data, or optimizing for one performance measure at the expense of others. These challenges require new kinds of "user interfaces" between machines and society. We will explore these issues, and how they would interface with existing institutions. About Joi Ito Joi Ito is the director of the MIT Media Lab, Professor of the Practice at MIT and the author, with Jeff Howe, of Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future (Grand Central Publishing, 2016). Ito is chairman of the board of PureTech Health and serves on several other boards, including The New York Times Company, Sony Corporation, the MacArthur Foundation and the Knight Foundation. He is also the former chairman and CEO of Creative Commons, and a former board member of ICANN, The Open Source Initiative, and The Mozilla Foundation. Ito is a serial entrepreneur who helped start and run numerous companies including one of the first web companies in Japan, Digital Garage, and the first commercial Internet service provider in Japan, PSINet Japan/IIKK. He has been an early-stage investor in many companies, including Formlabs, Flickr, Kickstarter, littleBits, and Twitter. Ito has received numerous awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oxford Internet Institute and the Golden Plate Award from the Academy of Achievement, and he was inducted into the SXSW Interactive Festival Hall of Fame in 2014. Ito has been awarded honorary doctorates from The New School and Tufts University. About Iyad Rahwan Iyad Rahwan is the AT&T Career Development Professor and an Associate Professor of Media Arts & Sciences at the MIT Media Lab, where he leads the Scalable Cooperation group. A native of Aleppo, Syria, Rahwan holds a PhD from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and is an affiliate faculty at the MIT Institute of Data, Systems and Society (IDSS). Rahwan's work lies at the intersection of the computer and social sciences, with a focus on collective intelligence, large-scale cooperation, and the social aspects of Artificial Intelligence. His team built the Moral Machine, which has collected 28 million decisions to-date about how autonomous cars should prioritize risk. Rahwan's work appeared in major academic journals, including Science and PNAS, and was featured in major media outlets, including the New York Times, The Economist, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. More info on this event here: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2017/04/Ito

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 13, 2017 04:05 PM

Center for Research on Computation and Society (Harvard SEAS)
6 Reasons Fake News is the End of the World as we Know it

Location: 

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138

6 reasons Fake News is the end of the world as we know it
Date: May 2, 2017
Time: 9:00AM - 5:00PM
Location: The Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138

by kmavon at April 13, 2017 03:38 PM

Jeffrey Schnapp
The Video is the Massage

Here’s a gem from the archives that is more than worthy of your attention: the televisual translation of the Fiore/McLuhan/Agel experimental paperback The Medium is the Massage, courtesy of McGraw-Hill “text films,” several Pennsylvania libraries, and Internet Archive. It’s a prescient piece of cybernetic pop, starring McLuhan qua new media oracle, circa 1970. Aside from the psychedelic lighting and special effects, it’s the excitement with which the words electric and electronic are pronounced that holds my attention. (But don’t miss the cameos by Alan Kaprow and John Cage.)

As readers of The Electric Information Age Book and listeners of The Electric Information Age Album by The Masses will be well aware, the Fiore/McLuhan/Agel book was first expanded into a Columbia Records LP, only later to undergo this televisual adaptation.

by jeffrey at April 13, 2017 02:14 AM

April 12, 2017

David Weinberger
The CluePlane Manifesto

(An unauthorized, unapproved homage to The Cluetrain Manifesto).
bi-plane

A powerful global reaccommodation has begun. Corporations are rediscovering themselves in their muscular masculinity. For we are the makers, the takers, and above all else, we are the winners. Customers, employees, the needy, the vulnerable are, by definition, the losers. Each one of them would gladly trade their seat for one of the tufted leather chairs in our CEO’s office. Instead, make sure your pathetic seatbacks are returned to their upright position, your trays are stowed, and you’re buckled in. For this is your pilot speaking, and we’re ready to fly the friendly skies of “PUT YOUR HANDS WHERE I CAN SEE THEM, MOTHERFUCKER!”

  1. Markets are reaccommodations.

  2. There’s the crew and there’s the screwed. Deal with it.

  3. When jack-booted thugs rough up paying passengers and drag them from your plane, it’s time for the CEO to step up and declare that there’s two sides to every story.

  4. There’s no customer need that cannot be met by a bag of off-brand peanuts.

  5. Customers of course have rights. But only once they have lawyers.

  6. Think of it like this: Boarding a airplane is like opening a shrink-wrapped product, an act that involuntarily voids all your rights. Except boarding a plane means also giving up the shreds of human dignity we didn’t already strip from you during the nudie scan, the TSA ritual ball or tit squeeze, the routine totally un-profiled examination of the darker-hued among us, the lack of sufficient seats in the boarding area, the unexplained delays, and the segregation into social strata announced over the PA. Also, I think we may have missed a spot in your rectum.

  7. Costs have gone up while fuel prices and basic services have gone down, yet more and more people are flying. Therefore, passengers must love us more than ever. You can’t argue with math!

  8. Virtually no other industry uses overbooking as a routine best practice because they don’t love their customers are much as we do.

  9. “First they came for my free crappy meal, and I said nothing. Then they came for my carry-ons, and I said nothing. Then they just said ‘Fuck it’ and came for the guy sitting next to me and dragged him off the plane by the ankles. And I said something, and I video-ed it and I posted it.” Sorry, I couldn’t hear you. I’ve got a corporate reputation to maintain.

  10. Every act of corporate brutality can be fixed by combining the power of euphemism with the audacity of neologism, catalyzed by a really expensive blue suit.

  11. It’s great to know that we’re making our employees so proud! Right, gang? Gang?

  12. Hey, it’s us against them, where “them” are the customers, right, gang? Oh, c’mon, gang, quit kidding around!

  13. You know who’s the victim here? The shareholders. How about some sympathy for them, eh?

  14. Y’know, it’d be a lot easier for us to fly empty planes and not have to deal with you all. You’re welcome. Ingrates.

  15. Hey, catch! Here’s your guitar. Sorry-not-sorry for the crushing.

  16. Have a bag of last year’s peanuts, on us.


Notes

1. No official affilliation with Cluetrain.

2. Thanks to Frank Scavo (@fscavo) and Alan Lepofsky (@alanlepo) for the prod and the idea.

3. Also posted at Medium

4. Photo posted to Pixabay by JayClark1. CC0 – Public Domain.

The post The CluePlane Manifesto appeared first on Joho the Blog.

by davidw at April 12, 2017 01:21 PM

Berkman Center front page
In Dialogue with Loomio & Enspiral: Moving Platform Cooperativism from Theory to Practice

Subtitle

Featuring Richard D. Bartlett, MJ Kaplan, and Natalia Lombardo

Teaser

Join some of the worker-owners of the Loomio co-op for an inside look at some of the more mature experiments under the “Platform Cooperativism” umbrella.

Event Date

Apr 14 2017 5:00pm to Apr 14 2017 5:00pm
Thumbnail Image: 

Friday, April 14, 2017 at 5:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
23 Everett Street, Second Floor Conference Room
RSVP required to attend in person.
 

Loomio is a platform for cooperative decision-making, built by a worker-owned co-op based in New Zealand. It’s part of the Enspiral network: a cooperative of entrepreneurs with a deep commitment to decentralising money, information and power in pursuit of radical social change. Join some of the worker-owners of the Loomio co-op for an inside look at some of the more mature experiments under the “Platform Cooperativism” umbrella. Together we’ll examine the lived experiences from Enspiral and Loomio, discovering lessons, challenges and opportunities for the Platform Cooperativism movement.
 

More about featured guests below

Richard D. Bartlett is one of the cofounders of Loomio, an open source software tool for collective decision-making. He's also a Catalyst at Enspiral: a decentralised network of freelancers that have been evolving their practice of commons-oriented peer-production since 2010. His background is in creative activism and DIY open source hardware. He's passionate about co-ownership, self-management, collaborative governance, and other ways of sneaking anarchism into respectable places. He writes at richdecibels.com
 
MJ Kaplan is a social entrepreneur and consultant who weaves across sectors to enable groups to align purpose and operationalize innovative collaborative practices.  She splits her time working with Loomio, Kaplan Consulting, teaching/coaching at Brown University and serving on Social Enterprise Greenhouse and Commerce RI boards.  She founded Kaplan Consulting in 2000, a networked consulting group that works globally with groups to gain clarity about shared purpose and to design innovative approaches to work that are deeply human-centered, agile and adaptive.   
In 2013 MJ was Ian Axford Fulbright Fellow in New Zealand.  MJ  was awarded the Cordes Innovation Fellowship by Asoka U and honored as The Outstanding Mentor for RI Business Women Awards. MJ earned her M.Ed. from Harvard University and B.A. Brown University. 
 
Natalia Lombardo is a co-owner of Loomio, a co-operative social enterprise building tools for collective decision-making. She helps groups to cultivate collaborative culture through values-driven behaviours. Her background is in community development through local action, permaculture, and creative activism. Born in Argentina, living in New Zealand: she’s a bilingual translator that loves to bridge cultures. 

Links

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by candersen at April 12, 2017 09:52 AM

April 11, 2017

Berkman Center front page
AI & Society

Subtitle

featuring Joi Ito and Iyad Rahwan of the MIT Media Lab

Teaser

ISIS. Trump. Uber. The 1%. What if all these phenomena reflect the same forces? What if you could understand those forces?

Parent Event

Berkman Klein Luncheon Series

Event Date

Apr 11 2017 12:00pm to Apr 11 2017 12:00pm
Thumbnail Image: 

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

AI technologies have the potential to vastly enhance the performance of many systems and institutions, from making transportation safer, to enhancing the accuracy of medical diagnosis, to improving the efficiency of food safety inspections. However, AI systems can also create moral hazards, by potentially diminishing human accountability, perpetuating biases that are inherent to the AI's training data, or optimizing for one performance measure at the expense of others. These challenges require new kinds of "user interfaces" between machines and society. We will explore these issues, and how they would interface with existing institutions.

About Joi Ito

Joi Ito is the director of the MIT Media Lab, Professor of the Practice at MIT and the author, with Jeff Howe, of Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future (Grand Central Publishing, 2016). 

Ito is chairman of the board of PureTech Health and serves on several other boards, including The New York Times Company, Sony Corporation, the MacArthur Foundation and the Knight Foundation. He is also the former chairman and CEO of Creative Commons, and a former board member of ICANN, The Open Source Initiative, and The Mozilla Foundation. 

Ito is a serial entrepreneur who helped start and run numerous companies including one of the first web companies in Japan, Digital Garage, and the first commercial Internet service provider in Japan, PSINet Japan/IIKK. He has been an early-stage investor in many companies, including Formlabs, Flickr, Kickstarter, littleBits, and Twitter.

Ito has received numerous awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oxford Internet Institute and the Golden Plate Award from the Academy of Achievement, and he was inducted into the SXSW Interactive Festival Hall of Fame in 2014. 

Ito has been awarded honorary doctorates from The New School and Tufts University.

About Iyad Rahwan

Iyad Rahwan is the AT&T Career Development Professor and an Associate Professor of Media Arts & Sciences at the MIT Media Lab, where he leads the Scalable Cooperation group. A native of Aleppo, Syria, Rahwan holds a PhD from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and is an affiliate faculty at the MIT Institute of Data, Systems and Society (IDSS). Rahwan's work lies at the intersection of the computer and social sciences, with a focus on collective intelligence, large-scale cooperation, and the social aspects of Artificial Intelligence. His team built the Moral Machine, which has collected 28 million decisions to-date about how autonomous cars should prioritize risk. Rahwan's work appeared in major academic journals, including Science and PNAS, and was featured in major media outlets, including the New York Times, The Economist, Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.

Download original audio and video from this event.

Subscribe to the Berkman Klein events podcast to have audio from all our events delivered straight to you!

by candersen at April 11, 2017 04:00 PM

David Weinberger
There goes that paradox!

“There is nothing that has not already been said on the Internet” has zero hits at Google. Until now.

For I am the Destroyer of Paradoxes.

The post There goes that paradox! appeared first on Joho the Blog.

by davidw at April 11, 2017 02:43 PM

Juan Carlos De Martin
Mons. Galantino sul Sole24ore: "La "triplice missione" dell'Università"
Mons. Nunzio Galantino (Segretario Generale della CEI) è intervenuto sul Sole24ore dell'8 aprile 2017 (p. 14) con un articolo dedicato alla triplice missione dell'Università, che cita anche "Università futura".

by Juan Carlos De Martin at April 11, 2017 10:43 AM

La recensione di Pier Luigi Sacco per "Domenica" (Sole24ore)
Domenica 9 aprile, in concomitanza con la presentazione di "Università futura" al Festival Internazionale del Giornalismo a Perugia, "Domenica" del Sole 24 ore ha pubblicato la bella recensione scritta dal prof. Pier Luigi Sacco.

by Juan Carlos De Martin at April 11, 2017 10:38 AM

April 10, 2017

Harry Lewis
Tip of the hat to Dave Fahrenthold!
Harvard, the Crimson, and my family are all proud that Dave Fahrenthold '00 of the Washington Post has just been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, for his work investigating Donald Trump's charitable donations and for breaking the "Access Hollywood" video story. Dave is married to my daughter Elizabeth (see family photo). Before he met her, he covered me for the Crimson while I was dean. See this early example of his thorough, fair-minded work covering an uncooperative subject!

by Harry Lewis (noreply@blogger.com) at April 10, 2017 08:04 PM

April 07, 2017

MediaBerkman
Algorithmic Consumers
Hate shopping? The next generation of e-commerce will be conducted by digital agents, based on algorithms that will not only make purchase recommendations, but will also predict what we want, make purchase decisions, negotiate and execute the transaction for the consumers, and even automatically form coalitions of buyers to enjoy better terms, thereby replacing human decision-making. Algorithmic consumers have the potential to change dramatically the way we conduct business, raising new conceptual and regulatory challenges. This game-changing technological development has significant implications for regulation, which should be adjusted to a reality of consumers making their purchase decisions via algorithms. Despite this challenge, scholarship addressing commercial algorithms focused primarily on the use of algorithms by suppliers. In this presentation Michal Gal and Niva Elkin-Koren explore the technological advances which are shaping algorithmic consumers, and analyze how these advances affect the competitive dynamic in the market. They analyze the implications of such technological advances on regulation, identifying three main challenges. They further discuss some of the challenges to human autonomous choice that arise from these developments, and examine whether the existing legal framework is adequate to address them. For more on this event visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2017/04/AlgorithmicConsumers

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 07, 2017 02:29 PM

April 06, 2017

David Weinberger
Not everything broken is in beta


CC-BY Kevin Gessner https://www.flickr.com/
photos/kevingessner/3379877300

A White House official has blamed the bumpiness of the ride so far on the White House being in “beta.” This has provoked Jennifer Pahlka — the founder and Executive Director of Code for America and a US Deputy Chief Technology under President Obama — to respond with heartfelt despair, worried that the tools she and her cohort brought to the Obama White House are now being used against all that that cohort accomplished.

It pains me to think that Pahlka, who is a hero of mine, has any regrets or fears about the after-effects what she has done for this country. For the foreseeable future, I think she need not worry about how the Trump administration is using the tools and mindset her cohort introduced to the White House. “This new administration lacks the understanding, competency, and value system to use those tools.”This new administration lacks the understanding, competency, and value system to use those tools.

Here’s the passage she cites from a New Yorker article
:

But, on Friday morning, Mike Allen, Axios’s editor-in-chief, reported that one of the officials in the meeting “views the Trump White House in terms that could be applied to the iterative process of designing software. It’s a beta White House.”

Allen went on, “The senior official . . . said the White House was operating on similar principles to the Trump campaign: ‘We rode something until it didn’t work any more,’ the official said. ‘We recognized it didn’t work, we changed it, we adjusted it and then we kind of got better . . . [T]his was much more entrepreneurial.’ In the White House, he said, ‘we’re going to keep adjusting until we get it right.’ ”
— John Cassidy, “The Keystone Kops in the White House” The New Yorker

“Beta” means “We rode something until it didn’t work any more”?? No, this official is describing what happens when you wake up one day and find out that your DVD burner is no longer supported by the latest upgrade to your operating system. That’s the opposite of “beta.”

The White House isn’t in beta. It’s in freefall.

Nevertheless, this passage bothers Jen because she and her colleagues used to say the same things about making incremental improvements when they were in the White House working to fix Healthcare.gov, the student loan process, and so much more. She writes:

Trump’s team is using the language of agile development to describe how they will strand millions of Americans without healthcare and ban Muslims from entering the country….

What are agile methods without the moral core of the movement for 21st century government, a commitment to users, aka the American people? My heart hurts so much I’m not sure my head is working quite right, and I don’t know if this bizarre application of agile methodologies is a farce or frighteningly effective.

Yes, agile programming can be used for evil purposes, but I don’t think Jen’s cohort should feel they carelessly left a weapon lying around the White House. The Trump administration lacks agile programming’s implicit understanding of how the future works, its theory or change, and its implied values. That’s why, at least so far, “the Trump White House is so non-agile that it’s not even the opposite of agile”the Trump White House is so non-agile that it’s not even the opposite of agile.

Agile software development is characterized by at least two relevant ideas: First, big projects can be chopped into smaller units that can be developed independently and often simultaneously. Second, agile projects are iterative, proceeding by small steps forward, with occasional small steps backwards. Both of these points stand in opposition to the prior “waterfall” approach?—?so-called because he project diagram looks like a series of cascading waterfalls?—?in which the steps for the entire project are carefully mapped out in advance.

To paint the differences too starkly, waterfall development is about command and control. Somebody maps out the flow, dates are assigned to the major phases, and managers make sure the project is “on track.” An agile project is instead about trust and collaboration. It breaks the software product into functional units — modules — each with an owner. The owner is trusted to build a module that takes in data in an agreed-upon format, operates on it, and outputs the result in an agreed-upon format. These independent module developers have to work closely with all the others who are relying upon their work, whether a module figures out what permissions a user has, determines if an arrow has hit its target in a game, or confirms that landing gear have been fully extended.

Agile development therefore cedes control from the Big Boss to the people most directly responsible for what they’re building. It needs a team — more exactly, a collaborative community?—?in which each person:

  • Understands precisely she needs to do

  • Understands how what she produces will serve everyone else’s input and output requirements

  • Can be trusted to get the job done well?—?which means getting it right for everyone else

  • Is in close communication with everyone relying upon her module and upon which hers relies

  • Understands the overall goal of the project

As far as anyone can tell from the outside, exactly none of this applies to the current White House.

Second, agile development is iterative?—?a series of small changes because it assumes that you cannot fully predict how exactly the end product will work, or even what exact functionality it’s going to provide. That is, agile development assumes that life, the universe, and all that are so complex that precisely planning a project from beginning to end requires an act of arrogance that borders on stupidity. And measuring the success of a project by its micro-adherence to a fixed schedule in a world that is changing around it rewards stubbornness over serving end-users as well as possible.

Now, Donald Trump’s preference for deal-making over policy
aligns with iteration’s acceptance that “the future is not the next card in the deck but is what we make of our hand”the future is not the next card in the deck but is what we make of our hand. But Trump’s style of deal-making is based on the superior skill of the individual (Donald), a ruthless commitment to “winning,” and is all about one big step?—?the end result?—?not a series of small changes. Ultimatums of the sort that Trump issued once he saw he was losing the health care battle are the opposite of the incrementalism of iteration. An iterative approach is exemplified by the Democrats’ approach: Let’s tinker with Obamacare to fix what needs fixing.

So, Trump’s White House is anything but agile.

But neither is it proceeding through a waterfall approach, for that requires a commitment to an end result, a rational and realistic understanding of the steps necessary to get there, and well-coordinated managers who are all on the same page. The Trump White House does have a commitment to end results, expressed as mob-inciting campaign promises that are often at the sweet spot where delusion and heartlessness intersect on the Venn diagram of policy-making. Beyond that, this White House exhibits none of the processes, commitments, or accountability that are the hallmark of waterfall development.

Jen’s cohort left tools the White House can’t use because it lacks agile development’s understanding of how change happens and agile’s fundamental trust in its community of practitioners. In short, Jen’s cohort brought a community to a knife fight.

Posted also at Medium.

The post Not everything broken is in beta appeared first on Joho the Blog.

by davidw at April 06, 2017 06:47 PM

Center for Research on Computation and Society (Harvard SEAS)
Paper Co-Authored by CRCS Postdoc Thomas Pasquier Wins University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory's Paper of the Year Award
April 6, 2017

A paper co-authored by CRCS Postdoc Thomas Pasquier has been awarded the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory's Paper of the Year Award! The winning paper is "Big Ideas Paper: Policy-Driven Middleware for a Legally-Compliant Internet of Things," by Jatinder Singh, Thomas F. J.-M. Pasquier, Jean Bacon, Julia Powles, Raluca Diaconu, and David Eyers. 

Abstract: 

by Gabriella Fee at April 06, 2017 05:32 PM

April 05, 2017

MediaBerkman
Haiti, Machine Learning, and Ankle Holsters: Reflections on the U.S. Treasury Department
In 1997, as a freshly-minted lawyer, Mariano-Florentino (Tino) Cuéllar joined the staff of the Treasury Department’s Office of Enforcement. Almost immediately, he was drawn into some of the fascinating issues that Treasury confronted at the time, from the regulation of electronic money to international policing and anti-corruption initiatives. In this talk, he reflected on his years at Treasury and discussed some of the connections between the challenges he encountered at Treasury then and some of the dilemmas facing the world today. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/01/Cuellar

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:06 PM

Security and Privacy in the World-Sized Web
We've created a world where information technology permeates our economies, social interactions, and intimate selves. The combination of mobile, cloud computing, the Internet Things, persistent computing, and autonomy are resulting in something different. This World-Sized Web promises great benefits, but is also vulnerable to a host of new threats. Threats from users, criminals, corporations, and governments. Threats that can now result in physical damage and even death. This talk looks back at what we've learned from past attempts to secure these systems, and forward at what technologies, laws, regulations, economic incentives, and social norms we need to secure them in the future. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/02/Schneier

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:06 PM

Civic Technology and Community Science: Building a Model for Public Participation
Public Lab is an open community developing and using civic technologies to support the pursuance of community-defined questions and concerns. Public Lab introduces a model that incorporates open source R&D practices including transparent collaboration and iterative design, along with deliberative democratic governance, and practitioner empowerment through critical making. Community science can enable people to collect, interpret, and apply their own data to effect local change or participate in broader environmental research and decision-making. We’ve conceptualized a tiered approach to project development, delineated by the scope of community objectives and the role of science in achieving those objectives. Examples of Public Lab projects from each tier demonstrate the versatility of community science, and the potential opportunity for it to facilitate public participation in environmental decision-making on multiple levels. In this session, Shannon Dosemagen discusses how participatory online communities can strategically support hyper-local goals and help to scale the ability for replicable change in how the public engages with decision-making processes. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/01/Dosemagen

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:06 PM

Engineering Open Production Efficiency at Scale
Wikipedia, largely used as a synecdoche for open production generally, is a large, complex, distributed system that needs to solve a set of "open problems" efficiently in order to thrive. In this talk, Aaron Halfaker uses the metaphor of biology as a "living system" to discuss the relationship between subsystem efficiency and the overall health of Wikipedia. Specifically, Halfaker describes Wikipedia's quality control subsystem and some trade-offs that were made in order to make this system efficient through the introduction of subjective algorithms and human computation. Finally, he uses critiques waged by feminist HCI to argue for a new strategy for increasing the adaptive capacity of this subsystem and speaks generally about improving the practice of applying subjective algorithms in social spaces. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/02/Halfaker

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:05 PM

Deterrence and Arms Control in Cyberspace
For four years running, the Director of National Intelligence’s Worldwide Threat Assessment to Congress has led with cyber threats to national and international security. Under statute, the several National Intelligence Officers constitute the most senior advisors of the US Intelligence Community in their areas of expertise. In this discussion National Intelligence Officer for Cyber Issues, Sean Kanuck, highlights the technology trends that are transforming cybersecurity and the future of intelligence. Assessing strategic developments in international relations and its implications for deterring malicious activity in cyberspace, his analysis focuses on the(in)applicability of existing arms control mechanisms and deterrence principles to modern information and communication technologies. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2016/3/Kanuck

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:03 PM

The Big Reverse of the Web: Are Our Policies and Standards Ready?
We're on the cusp of the next wave of the web, where information will come to people, versus people seeking it out. This "big reverse" of the web poses all sorts of issues: ranging from policy, to personal privacy, to standardization across devices. The creator of Drupal and co-founder and CTO of Acquia Dries Buytaert discusses what it will take to navigate a web that doesn't look or feel anything like what we know today. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/03/Buytaert

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:03 PM

Developing Effective Citizen Responses to Discrimination and Harassment Online
Discrimination and harassment have been persistent problems since the earliest days of the social web. As platforms and legislators continue to debate and engineer responses, most of the burden of dealing with online discrimination and harassment has been borne by the online citizens who experience and respond to these problems. How can everyday Internet citizens make sense of social problems online, including our own racist and sexist behavior? How can we support each other and cooperate towards change in meaningful, effective ways? And how can we know that our interventions are making a difference? Nathan Matias shares four years of research and design interventions aimed at expanding the power of citizens to understand and develop effective responses to discrimination and harassment online. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/02/Matias

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 09:03 PM

Back to the Drawing Board: Student Privacy in Massachusetts K-12 Schools
In 2013, the ACLU of Massachusetts set out to get a snapshot of student privacy policies in diverse communities statewide. We filed public records requests with dozens of school districts, asking for information about how they manage student information and handle digital student privacy issues. The responses were stunning: almost across the board, schools told students they had “no expectation of privacy” on school networks, using school email, or on school devices. The Supreme Court has said students don’t shed their constitutional rights at the schoolhouse gates. How can we apply this maxim in the digital age? For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/03/Rossman%20Crockford

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:53 PM

Copyright Law Year in Review
What ties together cheerleader outfits, monkey selfies, the Batmobile, a chicken sandwich, Yoga, and Yoda? Professor Peter Menell will provide an exhilarating copyright year in review. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/04/Menell

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:49 PM

Reconceptualizing the Right to Be Forgotten to Enable Transatlantic Data Flow
Based on the authors’ recent Harvard Journal of Law and Technology article, Reconceptualizing the Right to be Forgotten to Enable Transatlantic Data Flow, Sanna Kulevska and Michael Rustad will lay out the legal dilemmas that flow from the European Union’s far-reaching right to be forgotten (RTBF). Google Spain v. AEPD (May 2014) and Article 17 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will go into effect in 2018, are already driving a significant legal, economic and cultural wedge between the U.S. and its EU trading partners. In October 2015, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) struck down the U.S./EU Safe Harbor agreement that enabled data to be freely transferred from Europe to the United States and in February 2016, the EU/U.S. Privacy Shield was proposed as a replacement. Sanna and Michael will lead the discussion of the legal dilemmas that policymakers face in walking the tight rope between the Scylla of constraining the right of expression and the Charybdis of diminishing an individual’s right to control their personal data. The authors will use current case studies of takedown requests from Google to provide context for their discussion of how a Safe Harbor 2.0 might achieve the proper balance between expression and privacy. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/03/Kulevska%20Rustad

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:47 PM

A Burglar’s Guide to the City: On Architecture and Crime
The relationship between burglary and architecture is far from abstract. While it is easy to focus merely on questions of how burglars use or abuse the built environment — looking for opportunities of illicit entrance — burglary, in fact, requires architecture. It is an explicitly spatial crime, one that cannot exist without a threshold to cross, without “the magic of four walls,” as at least one legal theorist has written. Join Geoff Manaugh, author of the new book A Burglar’s Guide to the City, to discuss more than two thousand years’ worth of heists and break-ins, with a discussion ranging from the surprisingly — one might say uselessly — complicated legal definition of an interior space to the everyday tools burglars use to gain entry. Written over the course of three years of research, Manaugh’s Burglar’s Guide includes flights with the LAPD Air Support Division, a visit with a panic room designer and retired state cop in his New Jersey warehouse, an introduction to the subculture of recreational lock-picking, a still-unsolved bank tunnel heist in 1980s Los Angeles, and much more. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/04/Manaugh

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:47 PM

The North American Information Technology Marketplace: Three Decades of IT Channel Evolution
Alan Weinberger started out as a traditional law student. Soon after, he found himself on Wall Street with a major Wall Street law firm. He then took an academic route as the founding Professor at Vermont Law School (at the same time Bernie was just a carpenter). And, in the early 1980s, he saw that the revolution for the next hundred years was taking place right before our eyes. Mr. Weinberger had the simple idea to create a community (a digital nation) of like-minded professionals for mutual gain, marketplace leverage, and collaborative group learning. He also saw that the lynchpin, the smartest and most valuable element in this revolution, was local information technology (or "IT") experts. This talk will address the development of the information technology marketplace over the past three decades and the continued importance of small IT companies. For more information, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2016/04/Weinberger

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:43 PM

Why the Right Digital Decisions Will Make America Strong
The U.S. still lags behind much of the developed world in terms of the speed and density of its internet infrastructure. In the 21st Century this disparity in access to high speed internet could stand as a critical challenge to competitiveness in many areas, from industry and commerce, to healthcare and education, to civic life and culture. In this conversation, Susan Crawford discusses the potential futures we face as we consider how to invest in the wires that bring us our internet. For more information about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/04/Crawford

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:36 PM

Black 2.0: the New Liberation Movement
Carl Williams joins us to speak about the current Black Liberation movement. What and who it is, how it started, and how Twitter, Facebook (yes, Facebook) and other social media played a part. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Williams

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:35 PM

"Chilling Effects": Insights on how laws and surveillance impact people online
With Internet censorship and mass surveillance on the rise globally, understanding regulatory "chilling effects"— the idea that laws, regulations, or state surveillance can deter people from exercising their freedoms or engaging in entirely legal activities— has thus today, in our Post-Snowden world, taken on greater urgency and public importance. Yet, the notion is not uncontroversial; commentators, scholars, and researchers, from a variety of fields, have long questioned such chilling effects claims, including their existence or extent of any "chill" and related harms, particularly so in online contexts, leading to recent calls for more systematic and interdisciplinary research on point. In this talk, Jon draws on his doctoral research at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, to help fill in some of the gaps in our understanding of chilling effects online. Through discussion of three empirical legal case studies— one on surveillance-related chilling effects and Wikipedia, a second on the impact of the DMCA's copyright enforcement scheme, and a third survey-based study on "chilling effect scenarios"— Jon offers insights on these and other questions: What is the nature and scale of regulatory chilling effects online? Do they persist or are they merely temporary? What factors may influence their impact? Jon also reflects on the importance of open data platforms like the Lumen Database and Wikimedia Foundation's data portals to future research in this, and related, areas. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/04/Penney

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:35 PM

The Internetish Things of Cuba: Open Source and ‘in the Clear’
What is it like to use the Internet in fits and starts? How do communities with limited access to the global Internet use digital tools? Beyond sensational media narratives about Havana’s WiFi hotspots and the paquete semanal, there is a complex landscape of Internet access, digital media use and open source software development in Cuba. This talk offers a primer on Cuba’s digital culture and critique of Western political narratives surrounding technology, freedom and empowerment as they apply in the Cuban context. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/2016/5/Biddle

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:34 PM

Finding common standards for the Right to be Forgotten: Challenges and Perspective
Following the 2014 Google Spain decision rendered by the European Court of Justice of the European Union, search engines – and, first among them, Google – are tasked with the delisting of search results leading to outdated or inaccurate information about European citizens. This ‘right to be delisted’ has since then revealed itself as a highly controversial concept, raising issues such as the desired degree of protection of personal data over the Internet and the role of the act of forgetting in the digital age; it also highlighted the lack of an existing consensus over these questions between individual jurisdictions – and namely between the European Union and the United States. On 14 April 2016, the European Parliament has adopted the General Data Protection Regulation, which will, in two years from now, update and harmonize data protection law all across the Member States of the European Union. Its article 17 contains a ‘right to erasure’ or a ‘right to be forgotten’ which is set to formalize, unify and extend the existing Google Spain ruling. But how to make that happen in practice? How can legal fragmentation be prevented? Relying on his background in conflict of laws, Dr. Michel Reymond shows that finding common standards for the Right to be Forgotten will prove extremely difficult – not only regarding its procedural elements, but also when addressing its substance. He also argues that, before even starting a conversation between the U.S. and the E.U., some soul-searching about the nature of the right may need to be performed inside the E.U. itself first. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Reymond

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:33 PM

Applying network science for public health: Toward 'social' communication strategies
The social nature of today’s Internet is creating new public health and policy challenges. For example, the US in 2014 experienced the largest measles outbreak in nearly a generation, which led to the passing of the nation's most conservative vaccine legislation, eliminating the personal belief exemption in California. Research has identified online misinformation about vaccines as one of the risk factors for this outbreak. Through three big data case analyses on water fluoridation, the Ebola epidemic, and childhood vaccinations, we analyze the influence of scientific evidence and the influence of “social proof,” a form of imitation where individuals ascribe to the behavior of others in order to resolve uncertainty. Our work aims to answer the question, how can we employ network science to develop social communication strategies for public health that build on the strengths and opportunities provided by today's Internet? In other words, instead of asking "How can we share our message with our target audience?" should we be asking "How can our target audience share our message?" For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2016/05/Seymour

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:33 PM

Under-connected in America: How Lower-Income Families Respond to Digital Equity Challenges
While 94% of parents raising school-age children below the U.S. median household income have an Internet connection, more than half are “under-connected,” in that their Internet connection is too slow, has been interrupted in the past year due to non-payment, and/or they share their Internet-connected devices with too many people. Katz will discuss how being under-connected impacts the everyday lives of lower-income parents and children, how parents assess the risks and rewards that connectivity can offer their children, and the implications of under-connectedness for policy development and program reform. She draws from two linked datasets of lower-income parents with school-age (grades K-8) children that she has collected since 2013: in-depth interviews with 336 parents and children in three states, and a telephone survey of 1,191 parents—the first nationally representative survey of this U.S. demographic. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Katz

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:32 PM

Are We Shifting to a New Post-Capitalist Value Regime?
Every 500 years or so, European civilization and now world civilization, has been rocked by fundamental shifts in its value regime, in which the rules of the game for acquiring wealth and livelihoods have dramatically changed. Following Benkler's seminal Wealth of Networks, which first identifies peer production, the P2P Foundation has collated a vast amount of empirical evidence of newly emerging value practices, which exist in a uneasy relationship with the dominant political economy, and of which some authors claim, like Jeremy Rifkin and Paul Mason, that it augurs a fundamental shift. What would be the conditions for this new regime to become autonomous and even dominant, and what are the signs of it happening? As context, we will be using the Tribes, Institutions, Markets, Networks framework of David Ronfeldt, the Relational Grammar of Alan Page Fiske, and the evolution of modes of exchange as described by Kojin Karatini in The Structure of World History. We will argue that there is consistent evidence that the structural crises of the dominant political economy is leading to responses that are prefigurative of a new value regime, of which the seed forms can be clearly discerned. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Bauwens

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:32 PM

Exploring Corporate Structures and Governance Models for the Open-Source Community
Organizations that develop open source software are often inherently fragmented and loosely-networked, which can make governance and decision-making a challenge. In addition, as the open source community grows and becomes more global, so too has the need to establish strong governance models and corporate structures that allow an organization to achieve its mission, and foster a sustainable community both creatively and financially. In order to do this, it is helpful for open source organizations to understand the corporate structures and governance models available to them so they may evaluate the pros and cons of different approaches to institutional management and financial structure. In this session, we plan to discuss the various corporate structures and governance models available to open source organizations, including a discussion on when it is appropriate for an open source organization to seek tax exempt status. For more about this event, visit: https://cyber.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Ritvo_Hessekiel

by the Berkman Klein Center at April 05, 2017 08:31 PM

Feeds In This Planet