Jan 26 2010 12:30pm to Jan 26 2010 12:30pm

Configuring the Networked Self

Julie Cohen, Berkman Fellow

Tuesday, January 26, 12:30 pm
Berkman Center, 23 Everett Street, second floor
RSVP required for those attending in person (rsvp@cyber.harvard.edu)
This event will be webcast live at 12:30 pm ET and archived on our site shortly after.

Berkman Faculty Fellow and HLS Visiting Professor Julie Cohen will discuss a chapter from her forthcoming book, which explores the effects of expanding copyright, pervasive surveillance, and the increasingly opaque design of network architectures in the emerging networked information society.  The chapter argues that “access to knowledge” is a necessary but insufficient condition for human flourishing, and adds two additional conditions.

About Julie

Julie E. Cohen is a Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, and is a Visiting Professor of Law at the Harvard Law School for the 2009-10 academic year.  She teaches and writes about intellectual property law and privacy law, with particular focus on copyright and on the intersection of copyright and privacy rights in the networked information society.  She is a co-author of Copyright in a Global Information Economy (Aspen Law & Business, 2d ed. 2006), and is a member of the Advisory Boards of the Electronic Privacy Information Center and Public Knowledge.  She is currently completing a book manuscript titled "The Networked Self:  Copyright, Privacy, and the Production of Networked Space," under contract to Yale University Press.


Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Copyright License: 
Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution Unported

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Last updated date

January 31, 2015