Difference between revisions of "Writings on open access"

From Peter Suber
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* [http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/11-02-03.htm#objreply Objection-reply:  Do journal processing fees exclude the poor?] SPARC Open Access Newsletter, November 2, 2003.
 
* [http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/11-02-03.htm#objreply Objection-reply:  Do journal processing fees exclude the poor?] SPARC Open Access Newsletter, November 2, 2003.
 
** [http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4552039 Copy] in [http://dash.harvard.edu/ DASH].
 
** [http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4552039 Copy] in [http://dash.harvard.edu/ DASH].
** Also see the shorter but related [http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v426/n6962/full/426015b.html>Open access: other ways], <i>Nature</i>, November 6, 2003.  A letter to the editor.
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** Also see the shorter but related [http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v426/n6962/full/426015b.html Open access: other ways], ''Nature'', November 6, 2003.  A letter to the editor.
  
 
* [http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/10-02-03.htm#notnapster Not Napster for science], SPARC Open Access Newsletter, October 2, 2003.
 
* [http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/10-02-03.htm#notnapster Not Napster for science], SPARC Open Access Newsletter, October 2, 2003.

Revision as of 15:52, 28 March 2014

I've written a lot over the years about open access to science and scholarship. This bibliography of my writings on OA focuses less on news and more on commentary and analysis &#151;that is, pieces that may still be of interest. It includes books, newsletter essays, journal articles, preprints, and interviews. (Originally I only included interviews if they were "writings"; but after a while that seemed arbitrary and I began including video and podcast interviews as well; as a result, the list is now more complete even if its title is less accurate.) I omit pure news pieces, as well as minor pieces like blog posts, listserv messages, letters to editors, presentation slides, and small web pages. I plan to keep it up to date. &#151; Peter Suber.




Most recent first.

  • The State of Open Access. An interview with me and Elizabeth Silva, by Shauna Gordon-McKeon, Center for Open Science, November 27, 2013
  • Unlocking Research. A 28 minute audio interview with me by David Weinberger for Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, August 16, 2012.
  • Open Access and copyright, SPARC Open Access Newsletter, July 2, 2011.
    • Hélio Kuramoto translated this article into Portuguese, in three parts (1, 2, 3).
    • Constantinescu Nicolaie translated this article into Romanian.
    • Copy in DASH.
  • Free Knowledge. A 24 minute audio interview with me by David Weinberger for the Harvard Library Innovation Laboratory, June 2, 2011.
  • Public Access to Federally Funded Research: Copyright and Other Issues. A 68-video discussion of federal open-access policy between me and Mark Seeley, Senior Vice President and General Counsel at Elsevier. Held at Harvard Law School, sponsored by the American Bar Association Committee on University Intellectual Property Law, and recorded April 9, 2012.
    • Also see my blog post on this event for some follow-up discussion.
  • Open Accessories, Radio Berkman, recorded February 26, 2009, released March 3, 2009. A 17:30 minute podcast interview with me by David Weinberger.
  • E. Canessa and M. Zennaro (eds.), Science Dissemination using Open Access, Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, July 2008. (This book knits together pieces from many sources into a single narrative. Several of the pieces are mine.)
  • "Open access", a radio interview with me by Jesse Brown for his show, Search Engine, on Canada's CBC Radio One, May 29, 2008. Now a podcast. The interview starts at minute 13:30 and lasts about seven minutes.
  • Towards Open Access, The Earlhamite, Winter 2008. An interview with me by Jonathan Graham. (Not online.)
  • The Promise of 'Open Access' Publishing, transcript of a live, online colloquy sponsored by the Chronicle of Higher Education, January 29, 2004. Lila Guterman was the host who moderated the discussion, and I was the guest who answered questions.
  • The Database Paradox: Unlimited Information and the False Blessing of 'Objectivity', Library Hi Tech, 10, 4 (1992) 51-57.
    • A revised and expanded version of "How Teachers Teach, How Students Learn: Teaching in a Blizzard of Information," in Evan Farber (ed.), Teaching and Technology: The Impact of Unlimited Information Access on Classroom Teaching, Pierian Press, 1991, pp. 67-74, which is itself a revised and expanded version of "Teaching in a Blizzard of Information," Issues in Science and Technology, 5, 4 (July 1989) 29-31.
    • Copy in DASH.




The following are (or were) continuously updated and can't easily be placed in the chronological order above.