All courses related to Jonathan Zittrain

Counsel to the Internet Client: Practical Advice, Strategy and Litigation - Fall 2001

This semester, we will explore the nuts and bolts of advising and defending Internet-related businesses, organizations and individuals. With the help of practicing cyberlawyers and other outside participants, we will delve into some of the most contested issues involving intellectual property, speech, and privacy on the Net, and the means by which courts and legislatures are asked to take sides and, at times, affect the course of the Internet's evolution.

Internet & Society: The Technologies and Politics of Control - Fall 2000

This course examines current legal, political, and technical struggles for control/ownership of the global Internet and its content. The course will draw upon a growing body of cyberlaw cases and commentary, class members’ research, and participation by invited guests, including lobbyists, politicians, journalists, and scholars from the HLS faculty and elsewhere.

Internet & Society: The Technologies and Politics of Control - Fall 1999

This course examines current legal, political, and technical struggles for control/ownership of the global Internet and its content. The course will draw upon a growing body of cyberlaw cases and commentary, class members' research, and participation by invited guests, including lobbyists, politicians, journalists, and scholars from the HLS faculty and elsewhere.

The Law of Cyberspace - Spring 1999

This course will explore a series of leading Internet issues via a number of traditional and not-so-traditional methods. The course themes will include: whether the internet will ultimately allow for genuinely new kinds of communication or merely replicate what exists elsewhere; whether and how the internet can be governed, and whether the internet threatens traditional governance of real space; and the role of technical solutions to seemingly legal problems.

Internet & Society: The Technologies and Politics of Control - Fall 1998

This course will explore a series of leading Internet issues via a number of traditional and not-so-traditional methods. Course themes will include: whether the Internet will ultimately allow for genuinely new kinds of communication or merely replicate what exists elsewhere; whether and how the Internet can be governed, and whether the Internet threatens traditional governance of real space; and the role of technical solutions to seemingly legal problems.

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