All courses related to Jonathan Zittrain

Torts - Spring 2016

This course explores the American law of torts -- the circumstances and theories under which people owe others money for wrongs they commit -- principally as a vehicle for understanding how the law operates and how lawyers help to argue and shape it.

Rhetoric and Public Discourse – Spring 2015

Some of our questions: What roles do and should intermediaries play in setting our topical agendas and shaping conversations around them? What impact does and can money have in influencing opinion on a large scale? What new modalities exist to facilitate conversation and closure among parties who disagree in good faith? Should advocates and agents be treated the same as those who claim to be speaking for themselves? Are there ways to identify and mitigate discourse grounded in bad faith, a.k.a. truthiness?

Contemporary Issues in Foreign Intelligence Gathering - Spring 2014

We will discuss how an intelligence community's activities can be meaningfully communicated to the public while respecting its sources and methods; how agencies might internally reconcile their various missions to protect the public and protect public values; and what a set of authorities and limitations for intelligence collection might look like if a clean slate were available on which to develop them.

Digital Platforms - Spring 2014

The Internet operates in layers, and so does much of the technology that hooks up to it: PCs, mobile phones, tablets. Nearly two decades ago those platforms were conceptually simple: a "generative" base offered by one manufacturer, on which any third party could build. (Think: Windows and the programs that run on it.) Some efforts by platform makers to tip the scales in their favor in the layer above resulted in extended controversy and regulatory efforts, such as over Windows coming bundled with Internet Explorer. Today platforms are just as vital but far more complex. We have hybrids like the iOS and Android operating systems or the Facebook and Twitter platforms, where the platform makers offer their systems as services rather than products, influencing and sometimes outright limiting connection between users and independent developers for those platforms. How should we think about these new platforms? What counts as a "level playing field," and what responsibility, if any, is there for public authorities to enforce it? What lessons, if any, do the prior tangles offer for today?

Torts - Fall 2011

This course explores the American law of torts -- the circumstances and theories under which people owe others money for wrongs they commit -- principally as a vehicle for understanding how the law operates and how lawyers help to argue and shape it.

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