Difference between revisions of "New and Old Media, Participation, and Information"

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==Readings==
 
==Readings==
  
TBD
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* [http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2006/11/14/jay-rosen-on-open-source-journalism-2/ Jay Rosen, Open Source Journalism (video)]
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* [http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/wemedia/book/index.csp We The Media, Dan Gillmor] (only the [http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/wemedia/book/ch00.pdf Introduction] is required reading)
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* [http://journalism.nyu.edu/pubzone/weblogs/pressthink/2005/01/21/berk_essy.html Jay Rosen, Bloggers vs. Journalists Is Over]
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* [http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118460229729267677.html Keen vs. Weinberger], from the Wall Street Journal
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== Additional Resources==
 
== Additional Resources==

Revision as of 18:50, 16 February 2010

The profusion of low-cost media production and distribution has led to the rise of an alternative citizen-led media sector. Is this a passing fad of enthusiastic amateurs or the beginning of a fundamental restructuring of the way media and news are produced and consumed? Will the current trends lead to more information, better information, and better informed people or to an infinite stream of unreliable chatter? Will it lead to a more politically engaged populace or to an increasingly polarized society that picks its sources of information to match its biases and ignorance?


Readings


Additional Resources

Class Discussion

To read about "Disruptive Innovation", check out one of the best explanations (not in the video, but on the page) about it: http://www.claytonchristensen.com/disruptive_innovation.html


Links from Class