File:Haigh - Moral EconomyforFreeCultureWorkshop .pdf

From Free Culture Research Workshop
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Haigh_-_Moral_EconomyforFreeCultureWorkshop_.pdf(file size: 279 KB, MIME type: application/pdf)

Ukraine, the second most populous of the former Soviet republics, had been named as one of the ten “priority countries” with “unacceptable piracy rates.” Kiev’s open-air Petrovka Market has become a symbol for the blatant distribution of pirated books, films, music, and software. As living standards and disposable incomes have risen dramatically in recent years, Ukrainians are turning increasingly toward the Internet and to newly-available high bandwidth networks as a new medium for the exchange of music, films, and computer software. Drawing upon the explanatory resources of science studies, particularly the well-established literature on the social construction of technological systems, the authors argue that Ukrainians are literally and metaphorically reconstructing imported Internet technologies in accordance with their own culture. To explain this distinctive technological path the authors examine the interaction of technologies, users, and regulatory regimes. These have shaped the understanding of ordinary Ukrainian Internet users toward what, following E.P. Thompson, the authors call the “moral economy” of copyright and file sharing. We probe these understandings through analysis of comments on file sharing behavior submitted by a sample of Ukrainian internet users.

File history

Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

Date/TimeDimensionsUserComment
current16:21, 21 October 2009 (279 KB)FreeCulture (talk | contribs)Ukraine, the second most populous of the former Soviet republics, had been named as one of the ten “priority countries” with “unacceptable piracy rates.” Kiev’s open-air Petrovka Market has become a symbol for the blatant distribu

The following file is a duplicate of this file (more details):

There are no pages that use this file.