Difference between revisions of "Invita"

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==Case Summary==
 
==Case Summary==
 
In 2001, the FBI arrested two Russians, Alexey Ivanov, 21, and Vasily Gorshkov, 25, who were accused of breaking into dozens of sites ranging from Internet service providers to banks. Where they found financial records they could steal, they stole financial records. Where they couldn’t, they contacted the sites saying they knew about a recent break-in and offered their services to remediate the problems or they threatened to release other information stolen from the site to damage the victim’s public reputation.
 
In 2001, the FBI arrested two Russians, Alexey Ivanov, 21, and Vasily Gorshkov, 25, who were accused of breaking into dozens of sites ranging from Internet service providers to banks. Where they found financial records they could steal, they stole financial records. Where they couldn’t, they contacted the sites saying they knew about a recent break-in and offered their services to remediate the problems or they threatened to release other information stolen from the site to damage the victim’s public reputation.
::''(Summary from Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities, National Academy of Science, 2009. p350. )''
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:''(Summary from Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities, National Academy of Science, 2009. p350. )''
  
 
==Recommended Literature==
 
==Recommended Literature==

Revision as of 09:16, 8 August 2012

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Case Summary

In 2001, the FBI arrested two Russians, Alexey Ivanov, 21, and Vasily Gorshkov, 25, who were accused of breaking into dozens of sites ranging from Internet service providers to banks. Where they found financial records they could steal, they stole financial records. Where they couldn’t, they contacted the sites saying they knew about a recent break-in and offered their services to remediate the problems or they threatened to release other information stolen from the site to damage the victim’s public reputation.

(Summary from Technology, Policy, Law, and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities, National Academy of Science, 2009. p350. )

Recommended Literature