Difference between revisions of "Computers and War"

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==Categorization==
 
==Categorization==
  
Issues: [[Laws of War/Cyberwar]]
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* Issues: [[Laws of War/Cyberwar]]
  
 
==Key Words==  
 
==Key Words==  
  
''See the article itself for any key words as a starting point''
 
  
 
==Synopsis==
 
==Synopsis==
  
 
This article briefly addresses the legal issues surrounding computer use in classic kinetic-based warfare. Attention then turns to the most significant phenomenon for humanitarian law, namely the employment of information technology during network-centric, four-dimensional operations, which increasingly characterize twentieth-first century conflict.
 
This article briefly addresses the legal issues surrounding computer use in classic kinetic-based warfare. Attention then turns to the most significant phenomenon for humanitarian law, namely the employment of information technology during network-centric, four-dimensional operations, which increasingly characterize twentieth-first century conflict.
 
==Policy Relevance==
 
 
''Policy and Legal Implications, relevant law.
 
 
==Case Examples==
 
  
 
==Additional Notes and Highlights==
 
==Additional Notes and Highlights==
 
'' * Outline key points of interest
 
* Include quotes if relevant/useful
 
* Consider how these themes relate to other cases, broader thematic areas, etc''
 

Revision as of 20:35, 21 May 2010

Computers and War: The Legal Battlespace

Full Citation

Michael N. Schmitt, Heather A. Harrison, Thomas C. Wingfield, Computers and War: The Legal Battlespace. Paper prepared for Informal High-Level Expert Meeting on Current Challenges to International Humanitarian Law, June 25-27, 2004. Web

BibTeX

Categorization

Key Words

Synopsis

This article briefly addresses the legal issues surrounding computer use in classic kinetic-based warfare. Attention then turns to the most significant phenomenon for humanitarian law, namely the employment of information technology during network-centric, four-dimensional operations, which increasingly characterize twentieth-first century conflict.

Additional Notes and Highlights