The Video Production Project

From CyberOne Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Objective

Professor Nesson would like the videos from our lectures to be edited into something suitable for a broader audience, perhaps incorporating the footage from the second camera, adding some context, adding some supporting materials, taking out the boring parts. This is a logistical/technical problem as well as a video-editing project. Want to do it for just one lecture? Or all of them? Or just help figure out how to get it done?


Video Production Process

These particular guidelines require that an editor have access to the following (most of these things can be found at a public access cable station): Final Cut Pro (recommended) or iMovie, VisualHub, a DVD burner (recommended) or reader, and roughly 40-50 gigs of free hard drive space.

  1. Editor chooses class to edit
  2. Lecture video from chosen day (three separate camera angles) is compressed to a high bitrate mp4 files
  3. mp4 files burnt to DVD
  4. DVD(s) mailed to editor
  5. Decompress from DVD (if using Final Cut)
  6. Import from DVD (if using iMovie)
  7. Edit Footage
  8. Transcode to high-quality .mp4 and .mpeg2 using VisualHub.
  9. Mail or upload to Berkman
  10. Publish on Internet
  11. Publish on Public Access Cable (CCTV, etc)

Compression/Decompression howto's

Compressing: High Bitrate mp4 for mailing DVD

  • VisualHub settings for high bitrate mp4 files (screenshot).

Decompressing: for editing in Final Cut

  • Drag the folders containing the video from the DVD into your Final Cut project browser.
  • Highlight a single folder (containing the clips from a single camera angle) and choose File > Batch Export.
  • Subsequently select remaining folders for Batch Export.
  • When all folders are in Batch Export window, select an individual batch and use the following settings (screenshot).
  • Subsequently select and set up remaining batch folders.
  • Click the Export button, and let Final Cut convert the mp4 files into DV (4+ hours).
  • Close the project (no need to save)
  • Create a new project and import the decompressed DV files.
  • You are ready to edit.

Importing: for editing in iMovie

  • Create a new project and select File > Import.
  • Import all footage from DVD (1-2+ hours).
  • You are ready to edit.

Exporting from iMovie: once editing is finalized, create an uncompressed final movie

  • Choose File > Share or File > Export and then choose Quicktime and Full Quality (the resulting file will be big)

Exporting from Final Cut: once editing is finalized, create an uncompressed final movie

  • Select sequence (make sure in and out points are set properly)
  • File > Export > Quicktime Movie
  • Use the following export settings (screenshot).

Recompressing: Compress your final movie --> Internet


Recompressing: Compress your final movie --> Broadcast TV

Sign up to edit class videos!

First of all, profound apologies for not meeting all of you in Second Life tonight. Technical difficulties. If you have a Macintosh computer running either Final Cut Pro and/or iMovie, please indicate so here! There are two different ways we can distribute the task of editing the class videos, depending on your capability. We are especially looking for participants who are running (preferably) Final Cut Pro or (alternatively) another professional editing suite; but if you only have iMovie you can still be a great help! Please either post your email address here, or send it to jdaw@law.harvard.edu. Thanks!


Participants

Real Name SL Name Location PC Mac FCP iMovie Other Lecture Choice
Sheldon S. Mobile Widget
Kwan Bul ? Virtual Worlds (9-26)
Daniell Krawczyk [1] Chuck Commons Raleigh, NC N Y N Y Will Air on Public Access
Dean Egon Spengler Jamaica Plain, MA Y Y Y Y Internet Video (11-07)
Phil Shink[2] lIHd Sellery Durham, NC Mac iBook G4 1.33mhz iMovie Political Blogs (10-16)
Esmond Kane Pere Utu Somerville, MA At Home Labs Labs Labs Audacity Networks (10-3)

Video

Slide/Text Features:

LLHD Discussion

I'm no video editing genius, I have limited experience with it, but would be willing to help Kwan Bul (in whatever way I can) if he'd like. I noticed that there was some discussion about the slides and how they weren't very viewable for the extension students. I saw a very good example of a video presentation that incorporated both lecture type video and slides at the Keynote address of the 22C3 conference. [3] go to the page and search for the keynote speech (it gets get good around the middle and Joi Ito is an interesting speaker).

I was really impressed by how well it was done, as usually it is very difficult to integrate video and slide elements into a lecture. The process looks labour intensive, but it would be fun to try and emulate.

Ezi Discussion

AFAIK The Real smil format includes triggers for flipping an associated SlideShow. I believe thats how FAS do the "traditional" synchronised video and slideshow for Distance Ed classes.

In this class we are working with MPEG4/H.264 files and the spec does include some textual features in the "container" specification. I know you can provide special files to Quicktime, VLC and Mplayer etc to trigger on specified intervals (it can be used to provide non-derivative CopyRight-compliant Fair Use editing) irrespective of the video codec used. Staying with MPEG4, we could MUX subtitles or a Slide MENU into the stream - see below for a quick discussion into deviating from the clean standard. May be worthwhile just as a tech demo.

Perhaps if we can get more audience participation in marking event triggers, something as simple as a scripted timed rotation or url call would work with synchronized slides ... or we can just adopt the new features and with it favour one vendor, e.g. download this file if you want the notes in the video stream or go to this special wiki page.

Does the Democracy Player bring anything new to the table?


Bookmarks, Chapters or Timed events/triggers

According to the excellent doom9 guide the MPEG4 format includes bookmarking but due to slow uptake (vague standardization) heavily favouring certain vendors (Apple, Divx etc), its going to corner us into the "recommended clients" backwater to work with it.

IMHO opting in to fancy-features counters the broader audience requirement. I certainly agree that providing optional packs would be worth investigating e.g. subtitles (text notes) for the deaf.

I have used VLC to mark chapters in the class lectures. The process would involve re-upping a modified video and i'm not ready yet to vouch the vlc route as cross-client compatible. I hope to update this page when i have more time to work with the vlc process.


Alternate Views

Tends to be offered in the DIVX and MVK format, can't find any reference to an MPEG4 option. Again this does not counter working around the current standard with complimentary specific-client features etc. Could be as simple as just building a playlist to jump to different intervals in different videofiles.


The challenge of key light (lighting the subject) v. overhead:

One option is cabeling the laptop into a switcher - expensive - or having the editor insert ppt slides to transition shots. Another possibility is using the VGA/DVI/miniDVI(mac)/S-Video out on the video player (laptop, dvd, etc.) and cabeling to an encoder (computer or AV in of a Camera) to save digital info as a file that can be edited into the final video. Then you can light and focus on the subject w/o aperature convulsions.

  • In the spirit of multiple open windows, the video can be edited to, when appropriate, show the instructor and the ppt or video side by side, possibly even quad w/ lecture notes and instructor commentary.

Audio

Stereo

The stereo audio on the class videos is distracting as currently implemented, the sound veers across channels or is confined to just one. This prohibits/discourages headsets or speakers but is perfectly acceptable and audible for the non-headset crowd. For my purposes (and antiquated iPod) i rip the audio to a vanilla mono mp3 audiofile (only). If this is of value to anyone else, I can provide the modified files or upload them somewhere within the boundaries of the inherited distributed license. --Ezi 23:06, 23 September 2006 (EDT)


SOUND is KEY

The video will be compressed anyway, but sound is essential and trumps video quality when received by the audience. The stereo effect and random volume modulation is distracting. A person solely responsible for the sound would allow for a monitored exchange between Instructor - Speaker - Students.

Also, although the room isn't wired for sound, placing three shotgun mics in the front of the class with spreads covering the student tiers would simplify the sound problems with interaction. Pressure Zone Mics (PZMs) are an option, but ambient noise can be distracting.


Alternate Streams

Another option would be to provide an alternate complimentary audio track, as simple as a backing track? Some open-source music.

Off-Topic:

LLHD IRC

Another thing that might be really usefull, perhaps for future classes, is a backchannel IRC group for the lectures, though I suppose the wiki in a way fulfills that role. it would be really interesting to have some backchannel information integrated with the video (much like the slides are integrated with the video in the 223C video) in order to get an idea of what the HLS and other students are thinking. I mean their contribution to the course and the site is invaluable and, in my opinion, the more information that can be squeezed from them the better.

There is now an IRC channel #cyberone established on irc.oftc.net. If anyone isn't sure what IRC is or how to connect don't be shy about asking for help.

IRC would be yet another avenue for discussion, ignoring the low bandwidth-friendly aspect, it doesn't really offer any significant improvement over the communication Channels (Blog Comments, Moodle Journals, Wiki, Forums and to a lesser extent email) already offered. One thing i would really like to see is a little more feed/interaction/interplay between the existing components but realistically we're using disparate tools. We currently check all over to encompass the communication channels already offered --Ezi 22:25, 23 September 2006 (EDT)



Recommendations

  • Lets pick an Open Source client (mplayer or vlc)
  • Lets research optional features which compliment the vanilla video file
  • Lets focus on a single tech demo (subtitles to start)
  • Doom9 is recommending mp4box

--Ezi 22:22, 23 September 2006 (EDT)


Chat Logs

12 October 2006