Open access peer review

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"HARVARD is committed to the policy that ideas or creative works produced at HARVARD should be used for the greatest possible public benefit, and believes that every reasonable incentive should be provided for the prompt introduction of such ideas into public use, all in a manner consistent with the public interest." (Harvard University's Exclusive License Agreement Template)


CyberStrategy for Harvard, for Universities, for the Net

"Open Access Peer Review" is an organizational form for producing, vetting and distributing knowledge which will advance the mission of the university. If widely adopted by university faculties throughout the world it will contribute to the creation of a common wealth of knowledge open to the developing as well as the developed world. Wide appreciation among the universities of the world for the benefits of sharing in creation of and access to a common wealth of knowledge will serve to protect the Net by ensuring the support of the universities of the world perhaps strong enough to offset the growing pressure from governments and corporations to limit its open connectivity..

Strategy for the Berkman Center

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School is moving, institutionally speaking, to become a center of the University. Our method for introducing ourselves to the university is to assume as our immediate mission supporting and amplifying the work and recommendations of Stuart Shieber's Committee with respect to Open Access Peer Review.

Stuart Shieber's Committee

The committee members are:
• Terry Fisher, Hale and Dorr Professor of Intellectual Property Law, Harvard Law School, and Director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society
• Dan Hazen, Associate Librarian of Harvard College for Collection Development
• Caroline Hoxby, Allie S. Freed Professor of Economics, Faculty of Artsand Sciences
• Steven Hyman, Provost (ex officio)
• Gary King, David Florence Professor of Government, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science
• Zak Kohane, Lawrence J. Henderson Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, and Director of Countway Library of Medicine
• Markus Meister, Professor of Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
• Stuart Shieber (chair), Welch Professor of Computer Science, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences
• Sid Verba, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and Director of the Harvard University Library

Stuart Shieber Speaks to Faculty Council

Harvard's Faculty Council hears presentation on OA From the Harvard Crimson report on "yesterday’s meeting of the Faculty Council --the highest governing body of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences":

Welch Professor of Computer Science Stuart M. Shieber ’81 made a presentation to the Council about reducing the cost of providing scholarly publications in the Harvard libraries. “The [scholars] are doing the writing, the editing, the reviewing, and they’re doing the reading,” Shieber said. “There’s a market failure that has resulted in this system.” Shieber suggested that open-access journals might provide a new option for scholars, although many options are still being discussed. “Printing and distribution in the day of the Internet can be done in a completely different way,” Shieber said. “Access can be done at essentially zero marginal cost to anyone.”

Permanent link to this post Posted by Peter Suber at 4/27/2006 11:01:00 AM.

Jonathan Zittrain on open access publication; Peter Suber comments

What form of OA should universities recommend to faculty? Jonathan Zittrain gave his inaugural lecture on April 25, 2006 as Oxford's first Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation. His lecture title: The future of the Internet – and how to stop it. Zittrain argued: ‘Universities should encourage or even require their faculties to publish in open access journals and to publish working papers ahead of final drafts, so that their work is not locked up by some journal copyrights which are increasingly testing the budgets of libraries who wish to subscribe.’

Peter Suber comments: I applaud Zittrain for endorsing OA in his inaugural lecture. However, universities should require deposit in OA repositories not publication in OA journals (although they should encourage publication OA journals). (1) There aren't enough OA journals today and there won't be for some time. OA journals can easily grow in size but cannot as easily grow in number or scope. (2) Even when there are enough OA journals and they cover every research niche, a requirement to publish in OA journals would limit the freedom of authors to publish in the journals of their choice. (3) If the goal is OA, then universities needn't steer faculty away from subscription journals, at least when these journals consent to the OA archiving of peer-reviewed postprints, as about 70% of them do today. By contrast, (4) OA repositories are available today; (5) they scale quickly and easily; (6) they are compatible with the survival of conventional journals; and (7) they are compatible with author freedom to submit their work wherever they like. These are the reasons why all the OA mandates by funding agencies (public and private) focus on OA repositories, not OA journals.

Action Proposals and email discussion

stuart shieber, terry fisher and charles nesson met and discussed a strategy for advancing the open access issue at harvard of initiating a discussion leading to a vote of the law faculty on an open access resolution. our discussion led us to a tentative plan of presenting the law faculty with alternative resolutions, one mandatory, one opt-out. the purpose of offering choice is to promote open discussion and true persuasion to open access. the idea is to persuade, not to impose.

  • On Apr 25, 2006, at 3:59 PM, Stuart Shieber wrote:

Great discussion today.
(snip)
In an effort to summarize our discussion today, here is a quick attempt at a policy. The strong version:

"In keeping with the scholarly goals of the Harvard Law School, the faculty agree to the following policy regarding copyright in scholarly articles.

Faculty members grant to the President and Fellows of Harvard College a limited, perpetual, irrevocable worldwide, non-exclusive, transferable license to their scholarly articles for noncommercial distribution such as through an open-access repository. The license for an article takes effect at the time copyright vests in the article. To enable Harvard to prosecute its license, Faculty are required to provide at no charge an electronic copy of the final version of the published article in unsecured Portable Document Format (PDF) within a short period of the article's publication."

Here's the opt-out version:

"In keeping with the scholarly goals of the Harvard Law School, the faculty agree to the following policy regarding copyright in scholarly articles.

Faculty members grant to the President and Fellows of Harvard College a limited, perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive, transferable license to their scholarly articles for noncommercial distribution such as through an open-access repository. The license for an article takes effect at the time copyright vests in the article. The license can be revoked at any time before the article is published in a journal, conference proceedings, or equivalent venue by individual prior written notification to the Dean of the Law School. To enable Harvard to prosecute its license, Faculty are [required/expected] to provide at no charge an electronic copy of the final version of the published article in unsecured Portable Document Format (PDF) within a short period of the article's publication."


From: William Fisher

How about:

Option 1: Harvard Law School is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible. In keeping with that commitment, the Faculty agrees to abide by the following policy: Each Faculty member shall grant to the President and Fellows of Harvard College a nonexclusive, irrevocable, transferrable license to reproduce and distribute for noncommercial purposes throughout the world each of his or her published scholarly articles. The policy shall apply to all scholarly articles with respect to which the faculty member has not, as of this date, entered into incompatible licensing or assignment agreements. To assist the university in exercising the license, the faculty member shall, soon after the publication of an article, provide at no charge to the appropriate representative of the Provost's Office an electronic copy of the final version in unsecured Portable Document Format (PDF) or in such other format as the Provost's office shall in the future designate. The Provost's Office will then make the article available to the public in an open-access repository.


Option 2: Harvard Law School is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible. In keeping with that commitment, the Faculty agrees to abide by the following policy: Each Faculty member shall grant to the President and Fellows of Harvard College a nonexclusive, irrevocable, transferrable license to reproduce and distribute for noncommercial purposes throughout the world each of his or her published scholarly articles -- unless, prior to publication, the faculty member notifies the Dean of his or her intention not to grant such a license. The policy shall apply to all scholarly articles with respect to which the faculty member has not, as of this date, entered into incompatible licensing or assignment agreements. To assist the university in exercising the license, the faculty member shall, soon after the publication of an article, provide at no charge to the appropriate representative of the Provost's Office an electronic copy of the final version in unsecured Portable Document Format (PDF) or in such other format as the Provost's office shall in the future designate. The Provost's Office will then make the article available to the public in an open-access repository.


Option 3: Harvard Law School is committed to disseminating the fruits of its research and scholarship as widely as possible. In keeping with that commitment, the Faculty agrees to abide by the following policy: Each Faculty member shall grant to the President and Fellows of Harvard College a nonexclusive, irrevocable, transferrable license to reproduce and distribute for noncommercial purposes throughout the world each of his or her published scholarly articles. The policy shall apply to all scholarly articles with respect to which the faculty member has not, as of this date, entered into incompatible licensing or assignment agreements. To assist the university in exercising the license, the faculty member shall, soon after the publication of an article, provide at no charge to the appropriate representative of the Provost's Office an electronic copy of the final version in unsecured Portable Document Format (PDF) or in such other format as the Provost's office shall in the future designate. The faculty member may request that the Provost's Office delay distributing the article for up to one year after publication. Thereafter, the Provost's Office will make the article available to the public in an open-access repository.


Issues for Internet & Society Discussion

Links

Berlin Declaration on Open Access
Peter Suber's Open Access Overview
Peter Suber's Open Access Blog
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Science Commons
Recent workshop on the "information commons" organised by UNESCO, OECD & related organisations
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)
Benkler on OA
How to fund open access journals
Open Access or Differential Pricing for Journals: The Road Best Traveled? by David Stern]
RCUK Analysis of data on scholarly journals publishing
proposed.copyright.policy.scsc.12.05.pdf The UC proposal is available at http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/senate/committees/scsc/ proposed.copyright.policy.scsc.12.05.pdf

other reports are http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/senate/committees/scsc/ reports.html listed] at http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/senate/committees/scsc/ reports.html
especially an interesting set of SCSC.ExternalReviews.0206.pdf commentaries on the UC reports
The SPARC addendum is available at http://www.arl.org/sparc/author/addendum.html notes
Open CaseBooks

blog discussion of open casebooks

help we could use

help in linking people File:Wikispace.gif readings sandbox