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AGTech Forum Briefing Book: State Attorneys General and Artificial Intelligence

Published

by Kira Hessekiel, Eliot Kim, James Tierney, Jonathan Yang, and Christopher Bavitz

Artificial intelligence is already starting to change our lives. Over the coming decades, these new technologies will shape many of our daily interactions and drive dramatic economic growth. As AI becomes a core element of our society and economy, its impact will be felt across many of the traditional spheres of AG jurisdiction. Members of AG offices will need an understanding of the AI tools and applications they will increasingly encounter in consumer devices, state-procured systems, the court system, criminal forensics, and others areas that touch on traditional AG issues like consumer privacy, criminal justice, and representing state governments.

The modest goal of this primer is to help state AGs orient their thinking by providing both a broad overview of the impact of AI on AG portfolios, and a selection of resources for further learning regarding specific topics. As with any next technology, it is impossible to predict exactly where AI will have its most significant on matters of AG jurisdiction. Yet AGs can better prepare themselves for this future by maintaining a broad understanding of how AI works, how it can be used, and how it can impact our economy and society. In success, AGs can play a key constructive role in preventing misconduct, shaping guidelines, and ultimately maximizing the positive impact of these exciting new technologies. We intend for this briefing book to serve as a jumping-off point in that preparation, setting a baseline of understanding for the AGTech Forum and providing resources for specific learning beyond our workshop.

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